1. Eat real food, as close to nature as possible. It’s what we do to food that is a problem — processing, refining, reducing and altering in general. Forget about reduced fat and skim milk. The less processing the better. If you’re going to eat fat, choose good quality and go for full-fat. Eat avocados, use olive oil or coconut oil (yes coconut oil is healthy) in cooking, have nuts, wild salmon, grass-fed butter, and pastured grass-fed beef.

    I think that reduced-fat foods, particularly skim milk, nonfat yogurt, etc. are a slippery slope. When you remove the fat content from one cup of milk, you lose a significant volume, which means it’s replaced with milk that has a higher concentration of sugar to fat ratio. It’s not the fat in milk that makes us fat. It’s the sugar.

    — 

    A Chef and Doctor Talk About Butter 

    Medium is on a roll (not the dinner kind) with some great content lately. This conversation between a chef and a doctor is no exception. If it were food, it’d be calorically dense and nutritious. 

    (via chriskurdziel)

    Yes. Here’s to unprocessed food for better health for all.

    -cch

    (Source: zeb)

     
  2. 21:42 17th Jul 2013

    Notes: 17

    Reblogged from bijan

    Tags: quotesphilosophy

    If I could tell the story in words, I wouldn’t need to lug around a camera.
    — Lewis Hine (via bijan)

    +1.

    Enough said.

    -cch

     
  3. 08:25 12th Jul 2013

    Notes: 43

    Reblogged from bijan

    Tags: startupsTVstart-upsVC

    bijan:

    Over the last week, Microsoft announced that it was shutting down MSN TV which was came from their acqusition of WebTV Networks back in 1997.

    And during that same week, Samsung acquired Boxee.

    I thought I would share some thoughts since I worked at WebTV before and after the acquisition…

    Great and insightful post Bijan. Congrats to Avner & the Boxee team… truly a great guy.

    -cch

     
  4. In the connected world in which we live, the difference between average content and bad content is hardly noticeable. In fact, the difference between good content and bad content is not that big. Truly, the only thing that really gets rewarded is remarkable content. If you’re investing in content production, always invest in the most amazing, ballsy, exceptional content that you can get your hands on because if you build it, they won’t come. This quote sums things up for me:

    We’ve tried to work longer on stories for greater impact, and publish fewer quick-takes that we know you can consume elsewhere. We’re actually publishing, on average, roughly one-third fewer posts on Salon than we were a year ago (from 848 to 572 in December; 943 to 602 in January). So: 33 percent fewer posts; 40 percent greater traffic – source

    — 

    The Time For Content Marketing Is Now | distilled (via khuyi)

    This is so true.  While I do not wish to slam the host of startups that are looking to automate “content marketing”, the fact is that great, original content:

    1) Takes time

    2) Requires vision

    3) Necessitates risk

    That is not something that can be created by a bot.  It is not something that an algorithm can replace or make more efficient.  While cultivating a strategy and ethos of quality content may not yield the quick hits or instant recognition, in the long run it is a strategy that will yield the greatest gains.

    (via marksbirch)

    Great insight here.
    Don’t post just to post. Have meaning behind your content so others can pick up the signal in the midst of all that noise.

    -cch

     
  5. image: Download

    marksbirch:

WHERE DO STARTUPS WORK IN NYC?
The explosion in co-working and accelerators over the past five years has been remarkable.  To keep track of all of these locations, I put together a list in 2010 that quickly became outdated, so I put together a new list of NYC Accelerators, Incubators, and Co-working spaces in 2012 that I regularly update (if I missed any, please let me know!)
There are also several other great resources provided by NYCEDC, Crain’s NYC (and a nifty map), and Charles Bonello with more detailed information than my simple directory.  The great thing is that if you are looking for an office or facility to work out of, you have an enormous selection to choose from with over 100 working spaces covering a wide breadth of industries from arts to biotech to food to tech.  It truly is a great time to start a company here in NYC with the variety and affordability of office space throughout the metro area.
If you have a hankering for starting up someplace else however, you might want to check this global directory of accelerators and incubators on LAUNCH.  We still think NYC is best though!
nycedc:

In 2008, New Work City launched the first co-working space in NYC which provided office space for people who work from home, freelancers, and entrepreneurs. Today, there are over 100 co-working spaces in the City including incubator and accelerator programs with even more on the way. Read more at Crain’s

“(Incubators) are tapping into incredible demand from entrepreneurs and from people in a freelance economy. From the city’s perspective, with the Wall Street meltdown in 2008, it became incredibly clear that Wall Street was not going to save the day and that New York really needed to add balance to its economy and identify a new source for growth.”
- Jonathan Bowles, the executive director of Center for an Urban Future.

Learn more about some of the incubator spaces available here in NYC.


Great list of NYC start-up work places and resources here. Also excited to see some familiar friends and new ones this evening while judging finalist start-ups at the NYCEDC Innovate Health Tech NYC 2013 Demo Day at We Work Labs in SoHo! -cch

    marksbirch:

    WHERE DO STARTUPS WORK IN NYC?

    The explosion in co-working and accelerators over the past five years has been remarkable.  To keep track of all of these locations, I put together a list in 2010 that quickly became outdated, so I put together a new list of NYC Accelerators, Incubators, and Co-working spaces in 2012 that I regularly update (if I missed any, please let me know!)

    There are also several other great resources provided by NYCEDC, Crain’s NYC (and a nifty map), and Charles Bonello with more detailed information than my simple directory.  The great thing is that if you are looking for an office or facility to work out of, you have an enormous selection to choose from with over 100 working spaces covering a wide breadth of industries from arts to biotech to food to tech.  It truly is a great time to start a company here in NYC with the variety and affordability of office space throughout the metro area.

    If you have a hankering for starting up someplace else however, you might want to check this global directory of accelerators and incubators on LAUNCH.  We still think NYC is best though!

    nycedc:

    In 2008, New Work City launched the first co-working space in NYC which provided office space for people who work from home, freelancers, and entrepreneurs. Today, there are over 100 co-working spaces in the City including incubator and accelerator programs with even more on the way. Read more at Crain’s

    “(Incubators) are tapping into incredible demand from entrepreneurs and from people in a freelance economy. From the city’s perspective, with the Wall Street meltdown in 2008, it became incredibly clear that Wall Street was not going to save the day and that New York really needed to add balance to its economy and identify a new source for growth.”

    Jonathan Bowles, the executive director of Center for an Urban Future.

    Learn more about some of the incubator spaces available here in NYC.

    Great list of NYC start-up work places and resources here. Also excited to see some familiar friends and new ones this evening while judging finalist start-ups at the NYCEDC Innovate Health Tech NYC 2013 Demo Day at We Work Labs in SoHo!

    -cch

     
  6. newyorker:

A summer cartoon by Leo Cullum. Check out more cartoons from last summer’s Swimsuit Issue: http://nyr.kr/OrXqdk

A great laugh to start the morning. Probably many returning to work in the NYC/Philly area this morning can attest to spending the past July 4th holiday week on “the Cote de Jersey”. -cch

    newyorker:

    A summer cartoon by Leo Cullum. Check out more cartoons from last summer’s Swimsuit Issue: http://nyr.kr/OrXqdk

    A great laugh to start the morning. Probably many returning to work in the NYC/Philly area this morning can attest to spending the past July 4th holiday week on “the Cote de Jersey”.

    -cch

     
  7. image: Download

    marksbirch:

Having grown up in Brooklyn, I would never have imagined that tech would be a booming industry.  Incredible and inspiring to see…
nycdigital:

The Brooklyn Tech Triangle is working together to grow the tech and creative community.  A strategic plan was released by the Brooklyn Tech Triangle coalition to help make NYC the leading tech hub in the nation.  The strategy includes calls for enhancing workforce development, increasing availability of affordable real estate, improving transportation and more.  The plan focuses on areas in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Read the full plan at http://brooklyntechtriangle.com


Here’s to good things happening in #Brooklyn! -cch

    marksbirch:

    Having grown up in Brooklyn, I would never have imagined that tech would be a booming industry.  Incredible and inspiring to see…

    nycdigital:

    The Brooklyn Tech Triangle is working together to grow the tech and creative community.  A strategic plan was released by the Brooklyn Tech Triangle coalition to help make NYC the leading tech hub in the nation.  The strategy includes calls for enhancing workforce development, increasing availability of affordable real estate, improving transportation and more.  The plan focuses on areas in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Read the full plan at http://brooklyntechtriangle.com

    Here’s to good things happening in #Brooklyn!

    -cch

     
  8. thegongshow:

    AllThingsD has a nice piece this morning on the Fab financing (raised $150MM at $1B valuation). I think it’s nice because it reports the facts, but then also does a nice job of capturing the general tech scene sentiment around both the deal and the company. The TL;DR on AllThingsD’s piece is:…

    Couldn’t agree more with Andrew here. CEOs, of small and large companies, these are your core tasks and there will always be plenty of distractions as you run a business, but leadership is about focus.  This calls to mind this great business quote from John Paul Dejoria (Paul Mitchell Systems, Patron Tequila) from an Inc. article that I read the other week while on a plane for a work trip: 

    "I could go insane if I obsessed over every little detail…. My management philosophy is to pay attention to the vital few and ignore the trivial many."

    -cch

     
  9. Very interesting health/nutrition infographic which for those of you who have seen the movies Food Inc and Forks Over Knives already know many of these themes and takeaways. We humans should eat less meat and instead eat more plants, fruits, whole grains and unprocessed foods. A simple way to do the latter is to only allow yourself to consume a food or drink where its contents and ingredients you can’t pronounce or need a PhD to understand what it actually is once or twice a day max!

    To your health,

    Charles

    (Source: lucidty)

     
  10. image: Download

    miketrap:

They finished the last mile of the Boston Marathon today. Stronger than ever.

Love this. -cch

    miketrap:

    They finished the last mile of the Boston Marathon today. Stronger than ever.

    Love this.

    -cch

     
  11. continuations:

    At the height of the re-engineering craze there was one fantastic HBR article titled “Re-engineering Work: Don’t Automate, Obliterate.” In light of the changes in the labor market the choice of “obliterate” may now seem unfortunate, but the basic point of the article was spot on: don’t implement…

    Nice read and perspective here on innovation and competitive advantage, for both young and big mature companies alike. The trick of course, is to SUSTAIN competitive advantage in the face of fluid and rapidly changing technology and market forces (including regulation/policy and macroeconomic condition of the financial markets, domestic and international).

    -cch

     
  12. collaborativefund:

    by
    Founder/CEO at Collaborative Fund

    In San Francisco, you can find the “Airbnb-of-everything.” Just as Airbnb capitalized on the fact that many of us have a spare bed, bedroom, or even apartment from which we’d gladly make some money, many other industries have…

    Times… they (and industries and cultures) certainly are a-changing thanks to confluence of Internet + technology + social + mobile.

    Personally, I’m waiting and hoping that they most radically impact healthcare (including food/nutrition), education, and energy above all.

    -cch

     
  13. toddwickersty:

    But I’m a user first and that’s the main reason why I care what happens to it. I’m skeptical if Yahoo! does take it over. It’s super easy to be skeptical for obvious reasons, but I think it’s a good time for Tumblr to sell. I know if it does happen, I’ll continue to use it…

    Good perspective here on Tumblr community and being mindful of product and customer/community culture. I do not disagree.

    HOWEVER let’s be real and clear about the essential truth of the matter: no one person, not any single person (regardless of whether a seasoned VC or fellow tried and true entrepreneur) can truly understand the perspective or mindset of the founder(s) of this (or any) particular start-up company. There are ups and downs in any startup life, but there is also the personal history and dynamic that NO ONE can relate to except THE PERSON (PEOPLE) in THOSE shoes at THAT time.

    I love social media (and Tumblr obviously) in that it amplifies good and bad in this world and in particular it gives a voice and platform to anyone who wants to share an opinion.

    But let’s be mindful of that - they are individual people’s opinions. The founders of Tumblr or any startup at the end of the day don’t owe anything to their community, their customers, their colleagues or their investors. They owe it to themselves and what they see in the mirror each morning and to their families who have been through the journey with them, supporting them through highs and lows. IF the founders decide (for themselves without outside pressure) that this is the right time to sell and this is the right acquirer and this is the right price…. then let’s cheer and applaud them for a successful journey to date and outcome and wish them well for the future; let’s not second judge or criticize them from afar for timing, for whichever company they sold to, or the price.

    -cch

     
  14. 11:36 15th May 2013

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from miketrap

    Tags: quotesphilosophy

    image: Download

    miketrap:

Wisdom, from the great George Carlin.

Great quote. Always be curious and think for yourself. -cch

    miketrap:

    Wisdom, from the great George Carlin.

    Great quote. Always be curious and think for yourself.

    -cch

     
  15. A profile of Mr. Ramsey, who is refreshingly humble, down-to-earth and has a grounded and pragmatic opinion on most things.

    Example?

    “What I’ve learned from the human race this week is we still ain’t got it right.”

    Amen to that. Here’s hoping for more Charles Ramseys out there in this world and that they stay humbled and grounded despite what life throws at them.

    -cch