1. image: Download

    Brilliant and thoughtful piece here: “The Social Media Revolution Betrayed”.  Basically where does social media go from here?  And no, it’s not just prompted by this week’s Facebook’s earnings report as I’ve posted about this topic before.
It will be an interesting time over the next few months for these social and digital media companies, both public and private.  For successful private start-up companies, there’s usually a complicated set of decisions around M&A overtures and exit opportunities.  But for those who always dream of being a public company and ringing the NASDAQ opening bell, here’s a nice summary of “social stock” performance. 
-cch

    Brilliant and thoughtful piece here: “The Social Media Revolution Betrayed”.  Basically where does social media go from here?  And no, it’s not just prompted by this week’s Facebook’s earnings report as I’ve posted about this topic before.

    It will be an interesting time over the next few months for these social and digital media companies, both public and private.  For successful private start-up companies, there’s usually a complicated set of decisions around M&A overtures and exit opportunities.  But for those who always dream of being a public company and ringing the NASDAQ opening bell, here’s a nice summary of “social stock” performance. 

    -cch

     
  2. image: Download

    All start-up entrepreneurs and VC investors are familar with the J-curve or hockey stick up and to the right growth trajectory money slide.  It certainly is there in the background behind Jeff Bezos as he introduced the Kindle Fire today.  The growth of the Kindle and the number of Kindle e-books sold is astounding; just this past January 2011 the company announced the inflection point of more Kindle e-books sold than physical books (hard or paperback).
There have been some people out there debating what the introduction of the Kindle Fire will do to Apple’s iPad and Samsung’s Galaxy Tab and the entire tablet market.  For those wondering whether there is going to be a tablet “war” going on, my opinion is that such a view is somewhat myopic, and I’d urge people to consider the forest instead of just the trees.  
Bezos’ quote from earlier today sums up the rationale and vision behind all the work they have been doing in terms of amassing digital infrastructure and content over the past few years.
"We don’t think of the Kindle Fire as a tablet. We think of it as a service." - Jeff Bezos 9/28/2011
-cch
Update 9/29/2011 PM to my original post from yesterday:  
Here’s another key quote from Bezos to TechCrunch as part of a larger interview after his presentation that echos my opinion from yesterday around whether Kindle Fire is a big deal for the tablet market (not that it isn’t, but that impact to the tablet market is secondary to the fact that it, the Kindle Fire tablet itself, is primarily just a distribution tool for Amazon’s treasure trove of content and services), with my emphasis added in the text:  
“We think of Kindle Fire as an end-to-end service. In the modern era of consumer electronics devices, if you are just building a device you are unlikely to succeed. Today it is about the software, the software on the device and the software in the cloud. It is a seamless service—this is Kindle greeting you by name when you pull it out of the box. Some of the companies building tablets didn’t build services, they just built tablets.”
Hmm… so last week we saw KaaS from IBM as a business model and what they’re planning with Watson… now we’re seeing a slight evolution from Amazon SaaS to Amazon EtES with the introduction of the Kindle Fire.  This will be interesting! 

    All start-up entrepreneurs and VC investors are familar with the J-curve or hockey stick up and to the right growth trajectory money slide.  It certainly is there in the background behind Jeff Bezos as he introduced the Kindle Fire today.  The growth of the Kindle and the number of Kindle e-books sold is astounding; just this past January 2011 the company announced the inflection point of more Kindle e-books sold than physical books (hard or paperback).

    There have been some people out there debating what the introduction of the Kindle Fire will do to Apple’s iPad and Samsung’s Galaxy Tab and the entire tablet market.  For those wondering whether there is going to be a tablet “war” going on, my opinion is that such a view is somewhat myopic, and I’d urge people to consider the forest instead of just the trees.  

    Bezos’ quote from earlier today sums up the rationale and vision behind all the work they have been doing in terms of amassing digital infrastructure and content over the past few years.

    "We don’t think of the Kindle Fire as a tablet. We think of it as a service." - Jeff Bezos 9/28/2011

    -cch

    Update 9/29/2011 PM to my original post from yesterday:  

    Here’s another key quote from Bezos to TechCrunch as part of a larger interview after his presentation that echos my opinion from yesterday around whether Kindle Fire is a big deal for the tablet market (not that it isn’t, but that impact to the tablet market is secondary to the fact that it, the Kindle Fire tablet itself, is primarily just a distribution tool for Amazon’s treasure trove of content and services), with my emphasis added in the text:  

    “We think of Kindle Fire as an end-to-end service. In the modern era of consumer electronics devices, if you are just building a device you are unlikely to succeed. Today it is about the software, the software on the device and the software in the cloud. It is a seamless service—this is Kindle greeting you by name when you pull it out of the box. Some of the companies building tablets didn’t build services, they just built tablets.”

    Hmm… so last week we saw KaaS from IBM as a business model and what they’re planning with Watson… now we’re seeing a slight evolution from Amazon SaaS to Amazon EtES with the introduction of the Kindle Fire.  This will be interesting!