1. 12:53 1st Feb 2014

    Notes: 1057

    Reblogged from johngushue

    Tags: healthdietnutritionfood

    image: Download

    johngushue:

Here’s a chart that scarily sums up what’s out of whack with our diet. 

You are what you eat. And many Americans unfortunately are overweight or obese. Food is just one part of the health equation, but a big one. -cch

    johngushue:

    Here’s a chart that scarily sums up what’s out of whack with our diet. 

    You are what you eat. And many Americans unfortunately are overweight or obese. Food is just one part of the health equation, but a big one.

    -cch

     
  2. Eat real food, as close to nature as possible. It’s what we do to food that is a problem — processing, refining, reducing and altering in general. Forget about reduced fat and skim milk. The less processing the better. If you’re going to eat fat, choose good quality and go for full-fat. Eat avocados, use olive oil or coconut oil (yes coconut oil is healthy) in cooking, have nuts, wild salmon, grass-fed butter, and pastured grass-fed beef.

    I think that reduced-fat foods, particularly skim milk, nonfat yogurt, etc. are a slippery slope. When you remove the fat content from one cup of milk, you lose a significant volume, which means it’s replaced with milk that has a higher concentration of sugar to fat ratio. It’s not the fat in milk that makes us fat. It’s the sugar.

    — 

    A Chef and Doctor Talk About Butter 

    Medium is on a roll (not the dinner kind) with some great content lately. This conversation between a chef and a doctor is no exception. If it were food, it’d be calorically dense and nutritious. 

    (via chriskurdziel)

    Yes. Here’s to unprocessed food for better health for all.

    -cch

    (Source: zeb)

     
  3. image: Download

    Want to maximize your health? Fight inflammation with a healthy diet including these foods in the picture above.  For more about this major factor (inflammation) in debilitating diseases such like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer… check out this article from the WSJ.  You’ll find that these diseases don’t need to be so deadly or widespread, but it takes discipline to be dedicated to healthy food choices and living. 
To your health,
-cch

    Want to maximize your health? Fight inflammation with a healthy diet including these foods in the picture above.  For more about this major factor (inflammation) in debilitating diseases such like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer… check out this article from the WSJ.  You’ll find that these diseases don’t need to be so deadly or widespread, but it takes discipline to be dedicated to healthy food choices and living. 

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  4. Food & health survey: more Americans believe eating healthy is harder than doing taxes!  More interesting insights in this recently released report, including the statistics that more than half of Americans (55%) are trying to lose weight. 

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  5. Cool quick clip about the #food industry & how it must change in developed countries for #sustainability (note - developing countries’ organic food production is a model developed countries can learn from). 

    To your health,

    cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    Michael Pollan’s Food Rules by Marija Jacimovic

     
  6. Heart healthy diet

    Do you know what types of food and nutrition are good for heart health?  A lot of wives tales out there, not to mention conventional wisdom about what is good and bad for your heart in terms of diet.  It’s key obviously to your life, to promote health and reduce inflammation in your body.  This is a worthwhile article to check out!

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  7. beef its whats for dinner

    Very interesting article about the history of public health and food policy in America, particularly around the food pyramid and messages promoting dairy and meat (such as the above campaign pushing beef which I remember being bombarded with growing up as a kid).  A lot of interesting things to digest, but I think the bottom line: eat more fruits and vegetables, less meat and processed foods.  If you haven’t explored the impact of such a diet and on your health, you must watch Forks Over Knives.  It will give you a lot of food for thought. :) And we as Americans really need to actively consider the impact of our food choices, given the impact not only on our individual health, but also on our society’s astronomical healthcare cost burden (now $3 trillion and counting according to latest estimates)

    To your health,

    cch

     
  8. Exercise

    Nice summary and reaction to the recent NYTimes article “Fat Trap” that I read and tweeted the other day below from Puneet (a fellow HBS alum in healthcare and Blueprint Health mentor).  So many people struggle with their body images, no doubt fueled by advertising and increasingly in many ways because of social media as some surveys suggest that 80% of women have insecurity with their looks or body images due to media. In particular, given that it is the holiday season and New Year’s resolution time, this is a good article to digest to understand some of the physiology, psychology, genetic and environmental factors associated with health, fitness, and weight-loss.  Hopefully we all can strive in little and regular ways to make better decisions around health which will lead to increased happiness, and hopefully if not longer lives at least better quality lives.  You don’t need to strive for absolute perfection, but consistency of habits is important.  Breaking things down into little habits and behavior change steps per BJ Fogg is helpful for successful, lasting habit change.  The little decisions we make day in and day out, week in and week out, impact our health and quality of life years down the road.  I’m particularly mindful of this, given that my paternal grandmom (and last grandparent) passed away earlier this week in Taiwan at the age of 85.  

    To your (and your families and loved ones) health for 2012,

    -cch

    ghst-innovation:

    Journalist Tara Parker-Pope makes an important contribution to the obesity and diabetes conversation in her recent article: Why Lost Pounds Come Back (NY Times). It’s great journalism, and worth the time to read the piece in its entirety.

    There are a few points from her piece that I…

     
  9. Food, nutrition, and health are the topic for the day… I haven’t seen this movie yet, but it’s on my (long) to do list. Check out the Forks Over Knives website too for more information.  I definitely believe (thanks to research that has already been done), that many of the chronic health conditions plaguing our society (hypertension, diabetes, etc.) can be controlled and prevented by changes to diet and behavior.  Less reliance on pills, more engagement around healthy (less animal based and processed foods) eating and exercise!  Hopefully this gives you some food for thought before lunch (or breakfast). :)

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  10. Chinese food

    Hmmm… now, big caveat that I haven’t technically lived in NYC (although I have been spending more time here as of late and probably will going forward), but I have tried about a dozen of the places on this list and can say they are legit.  I don’t know for sure though whether actual Chinese people were involved with the curation and sampling of this list.  But thanks to Taylor for the heads up. 

    -cch

     
  11. image: Download

    So the USDA pushes fruits & veggies as part of a balanced diet in its public health message, but the US government actually subsidizes meat, dairy, and grains (corn) to a much larger degree.  Food is a huge industry, but interestingly enough the US Dept of Agriculture actually spends most of its subsidies on food ($79 billion or 2/3 of it’s overall annual budget), not farm subsidies.
Whatever the case may be, we need to start improving diet and nutrition with kids these days if we’re going to combat the staggering obesity rates in this country.  Eight states now have childhood obesity rates of greater than 20%, and more than 2/3 of the states (38) have adult obesity rates greater than 25%!  We’re not talking about being simply overweight, but being obese!  There are clear negative financial impacts associated with being overweight and obese as I have mentioned before, so this trend definitely impacts our health as human beings and our economy’s health.  Recent research suggests that at this rate, 50% of the US population will be obese by 2030.  Think about the added costs: about $6,500 - $8,400 in additional expenses annually per individual due to obesity.   
More people need to realize this fact (as referenced by the author at the end of the Forbes article summarizing this recent research on obesity): “Your health is your most important asset.”
-cch
jayparkinsonmd:

via fooducate
The food plate looks healthful enough, but federal incentives to farmers reflect an entirely different agenda. In large part, the government pays farmers who grow food for animals that become meat. (via Washington Post).

    So the USDA pushes fruits & veggies as part of a balanced diet in its public health message, but the US government actually subsidizes meat, dairy, and grains (corn) to a much larger degree.  Food is a huge industry, but interestingly enough the US Dept of Agriculture actually spends most of its subsidies on food ($79 billion or 2/3 of it’s overall annual budget), not farm subsidies.

    Whatever the case may be, we need to start improving diet and nutrition with kids these days if we’re going to combat the staggering obesity rates in this country.  Eight states now have childhood obesity rates of greater than 20%, and more than 2/3 of the states (38) have adult obesity rates greater than 25%!  We’re not talking about being simply overweight, but being obese!  There are clear negative financial impacts associated with being overweight and obese as I have mentioned before, so this trend definitely impacts our health as human beings and our economy’s health.  Recent research suggests that at this rate, 50% of the US population will be obese by 2030.  Think about the added costs: about $6,500 - $8,400 in additional expenses annually per individual due to obesity.   

    More people need to realize this fact (as referenced by the author at the end of the Forbes article summarizing this recent research on obesity): “Your health is your most important asset.”

    -cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    via fooducate

    The food plate looks healthful enough, but federal incentives to farmers reflect an entirely different agenda. In large part, the government pays farmers who grow food for animals that become meat. (via Washington Post).

     
  12. Wow. This is an awesome cover of Coldplay’s The Scientist by (slick and 78 year old!) Willie Nelson.  In particular, this is in support for a return to natural farming (American farming in particular is a cause that Nelson has championed for for the past 25 years) as part of a campaign for Chipotle, and indeed… part of a broader movement these days around consumers demanding less “manufacturing” of food.

    Very cool video… and while I will admit I love a nice burger every now and then, as I’ve blogged about before - we all need to be mindful of our food decisions and the impact on our environment and sustainability.

    To your health,

    -cch 

     
  13. Food choices

    I thought this article was interesting because a) everyone eats (well, Warren Jeffs notwithstanding) and b) most people can benefit from tips on how to eat better, no matter snacks or meals.  Truth be told, I was somewhat surprised by the statistic that Cornell researchers came up with when asking study participants the number of eating decisions they made daily.  Most of the study volunteers believed they made 15 eating decisions each day.  However, the researchers determined that the actual number of eating decisions made daily is about 221, which is almost 15 x 15!!!  

    Just goes to show… we need to shift the paradigm of what constitutes “health” and “healthcare”.  Diet and nutrition very much impacts your short and long term health.  7 in 10 deaths in the US are due to chronic disease, and most of these are preventable with the adoption of the right behaviors (healthy eating, regular exercise, limited use of tobacco and alcohol).   You don’t need to be a resolute teetotaler when it comes to eating and snacking (i.e. gluten free, organic fruit-and-vegetable-only-diet vs. an occasional cheeseburger)… but as they say, everything in moderation!

    -cch

     
  14. image: Download

    Amazing infographic on how common foods have very different carbon footprints.  And you should check out the more detailed report: “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” which you can find here.  Bottom line: less meat and cheese, more greens are better for you and our planet.  We all need to be more mindful and educated on food and energy sustainability.
Might need to revisit Food Inc. If you haven’t seen the movie, you should definitely check it out.  
"The way we eat has changed more in the last 50 years than in the prior 10,000".
-cch
utnereader:

“All meat is not created equal,” reads a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” evaluates 20 common protein-rich foods to determine the healthiest picks for the planet and for our bodies.
The best bet is the friendly lentil. The worst offenders? Lamb, beef, and (say it ain’t so!) cheese. Read more …

    Amazing infographic on how common foods have very different carbon footprints.  And you should check out the more detailed report: “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” which you can find here.  Bottom line: less meat and cheese, more greens are better for you and our planet.  We all need to be more mindful and educated on food and energy sustainability.

    Might need to revisit Food Inc. If you haven’t seen the movie, you should definitely check it out.  

    "The way we eat has changed more in the last 50 years than in the prior 10,000".

    -cch

    utnereader:

    “All meat is not created equal,” reads a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The “Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change + Health” evaluates 20 common protein-rich foods to determine the healthiest picks for the planet and for our bodies.

    The best bet is the friendly lentil. The worst offenders? Lamb, beef, and (say it ain’t so!) cheese. Read more …