1. 18:38 11th Jun 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from oscarhealth

    Tags: healthcarehealth

    oscarhealth:

    Covering a new generation of uninsured.

    Great piece here on Oscar - health insurance for the now generation.

    -cch

     
  2. 11:55 2nd Jun 2014

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from slimandfitnow

    Tags: fitnesshealthhealthy

    slimandfitnow:

More On Slimarea.com

This is the truth for healthy living. -cch

    slimandfitnow:

    More On Slimarea.com

    This is the truth for healthy living.

    -cch

     
  3. oscarhealth:

    By many measures, Oscar is off to a good start. We are proud of the product that we have built as well as the experience we are delivering to our customers.

    The healthcare industry in the United States is broken. Our ambitions are significant and our intentions are good - but we are still…

    $155MM raised in two years for this tech-enabled health insurance “start-up.” Next steps: growing and scaling beyond NY. Great to see Oscar growing and having the capital to continue to execute, iterate, and expand on its mission.

    -cch

     
  4. Infograph: How soft drinks impact your health

    image

    This past week I was reminded of how Americans literally eat and drink themselves to death.  Health is an equation that consists of regular exercise and practical eating and drinking habits.  Sugar and sweeteners are bad for you and contribute heavily to our nation’s growing obesity epidemic.  Many Americans hydrate with soda.  At all health conferences I’ve attended, soda is provided as part of the catering spread.  If the above infographic and statistics don’t give you pause, here are a few more sobering data points for you to consider the next time you reach for a can or bottle of soda (regular or diet):

    1. Do you think it’s healthy, safe, or natural to drink flame retardant?

    2. Research shows that even one diet soda a day (thanks to the artificial sweetener aspartame) increases risks for various cancers by 31 - 102%!

    3. Regular, heavy consumption of soda can rot and erode your teeth (thanks to citric and phosphoric acid) just like meth and crack cocaine!

    This is a lot of information to take in and as someone interested in health and public health I’ve known these data points for some time.  However, I needed to be reminded this week just how unhealthy soda is for us.  So… I’m sure it won’t be easy, but I’m going to try and quit soda cold turkey! 

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  5. 12:44 7th Feb 2014

    Notes: 44

    Reblogged from oscarhealth

    Tags: healthcarehealthinnovation

    image: Download

    naveen:

What I’ve been doing at Oscar.
These past few months, I have been helping a couple of startups I like.
Sometimes, I have been investing in them. (Well, I’m trying to: I am basically making it up and learning as I go along, but it could be argued that’s what all angel investing really is about.)
Sometimes, I have been spending time hanging out at a company and helping more directly.
But regardless of whether I invest or help a team more directly, I think the way I’ve been thinking about it is to only get involved in projects that I wish I myself had started. (Max Levchin said it best: “One of the best heuristics I found when deciding to invest [in] a startup is whether I would seriously consider joining it, if asked.”).
The company that I’ve spent the most time with recently is Oscar Health: I’ve been here for the last five months.
If you know me, you already know I’ve been curious about and playing around in the health space. My hacking around in the quantified self space brought me to personal health, which is basically the idea of using tools (either built by the community or by health & fitness companies) to take charge of our own health. This personal health movement can be thought of one model where care is proactive rather than reactive. All this got me closer to learning about where the healthcare system is really broken and needs technology’s help the most.
That, of course, brought me to Oscar. I had already known the guys before they got started and I was always excited about the possibilities anytime we got together to talk about the idea of starting an insurance company. If you want, think of my exploration as a see-saw: “things that we do for ourselves” on the left and “things a care provider does for us” on the right. I started on the left and I slowly started learning and moving right. And then I figured I should skip ahead and jump all the way to the right and see the world from Oscar’s perspective.
I’ve been helping Oscar in various roles: with recruiting for different parts of the team (mainly on the product and engineering sides); with general company “things” (helping with PR/marketing, with process, organizing engineering and recruiting meets, &c.).
I also spent a lot of time helping build different parts of the product:
The mobile experience - of course, this one was easy. Many of our members are young and tech-savvy and almost always on their mobile phones. They order food, their cabs, buy movie tickets, read the news, see train times, search for things exclusively on mobile. So why shouldn’t they have a great experience where their healthcare questions and delivery also happens on mobile? I made this a big priority for the team for the January 1st launch: we worked nights and days with a very tiny team. And, in something like eight weeks, we put together a great Oscar Member app for iOS. (Yes, Android at some point very soon!).
The care finder - this tool can be thought of as your first point of contact when you look to solve an issue in health for yourself or a family member. Instead of blindly Googling for an answer, we imagine that Oscar itself can be your first point of contact. You could even think of it like foursquare’s “Explore”: before you go somewhere, use the search and allow it to pass you to the right spot. The mechanics of how this works are hidden behind the scenes in order to keep the interface simple, but the idea is that it will use basic information about each provider to point you to the right place. Over time, we imagine this system can get better as more data points and views from your friends are added in. “Show me only doctors that can speak Spanish.” – “Go here because many people your age go here.” – “Show me only providers that have many years of experience and happen to be tech-savvy, too.” Why should a health insurance company only step in at the very end of care? (That is: at the point where care has already been delivered and the insurer only steps in to pay your bill for you.) The idea instead is that when you need help, you ask us and we point you to an appropriate place of care that not only solves your needs but also does it transparently.
The “Doctor on Call” - this one is something we are really proud of and excited about. Some of us were lucky enough to grow up with a family doctor who would be able to answer simple questions over the phone: helping you get care and saving you time from having to drive out to the doctor’s office and taking a couple of hours out of your work day. Whatever happened to those days? Oscar’s “Doctor on Call” does exactly this. We’ve partnered with Teladoc and their physician network to provide this service. So, at any time, no matter where you are (in the U.S.), you’ll be able to ring up a doctor and talk to them about a problem you have. The doctor will be able to recommend a solution, prescribe you medicine or, in cases where a further in-person visit is needed, send you to a specialist to get care. And the best part: all this is free for members. We could have pointed members to independent applications out there now that seem to do this, but we wanted to embed this experience natively into Oscar itself. This way, you never have to leave this ecosystem and use yet another login to use such a system. And by seamlessly integrating this, we could also hide the costs and make it free for you in a much easier way.
All-in-all, this is just the start of even deeper products and issues Oscar can solve.
The appeal in Oscar is not only that we get to see through 2014 eyes and solve all the things that incumbents have trouble solving. Or the fact that we can bring a tech-focused approach and solutions to the health care space. To me, the most exciting is that by starting over from scratch, we have the ability to write a new playbook on how a health insurance company should work. We have a chance to provide additional features and services that customers have not expected before. We have the ability to start your care and our relationship with you not after you get hurt and after you’ve been fixed up by the doctor, but rather by being the first point of contact when you do need care. And perhaps, someday, so easy we will even get one step ahead of you and actively alert you to offer you services before you come to realize you need them.

Building a health insurance company anew from the ground up for the 21st century is a huge undertaking. But one that has consumers and technology (web and mobile) as part of its core value proposition and product strategy  is refreshing. The way it should be, as it is done in most other industries. -cch

    naveen:

    What I’ve been doing at Oscar.

    These past few months, I have been helping a couple of startups I like.

    Sometimes, I have been investing in them. (Well, I’m trying to: I am basically making it up and learning as I go along, but it could be argued that’s what all angel investing really is about.)

    Sometimes, I have been spending time hanging out at a company and helping more directly.

    But regardless of whether I invest or help a team more directly, I think the way I’ve been thinking about it is to only get involved in projects that I wish I myself had started. (Max Levchin said it best: “One of the best heuristics I found when deciding to invest [in] a startup is whether I would seriously consider joining it, if asked.”).

    The company that I’ve spent the most time with recently is Oscar Health: I’ve been here for the last five months.

    If you know me, you already know I’ve been curious about and playing around in the health space. My hacking around in the quantified self space brought me to personal health, which is basically the idea of using tools (either built by the community or by health & fitness companies) to take charge of our own health. This personal health movement can be thought of one model where care is proactive rather than reactive. All this got me closer to learning about where the healthcare system is really broken and needs technology’s help the most.

    That, of course, brought me to Oscar. I had already known the guys before they got started and I was always excited about the possibilities anytime we got together to talk about the idea of starting an insurance company. If you want, think of my exploration as a see-saw: “things that we do for ourselves” on the left and “things a care provider does for us” on the right. I started on the left and I slowly started learning and moving right. And then I figured I should skip ahead and jump all the way to the right and see the world from Oscar’s perspective.

    I’ve been helping Oscar in various roles: with recruiting for different parts of the team (mainly on the product and engineering sides); with general company “things” (helping with PR/marketing, with process, organizing engineering and recruiting meets, &c.).

    I also spent a lot of time helping build different parts of the product:

    The mobile experience - of course, this one was easy. Many of our members are young and tech-savvy and almost always on their mobile phones. They order food, their cabs, buy movie tickets, read the news, see train times, search for things exclusively on mobile. So why shouldn’t they have a great experience where their healthcare questions and delivery also happens on mobile? I made this a big priority for the team for the January 1st launch: we worked nights and days with a very tiny team. And, in something like eight weeks, we put together a great Oscar Member app for iOS. (Yes, Android at some point very soon!).

    The care finder - this tool can be thought of as your first point of contact when you look to solve an issue in health for yourself or a family member. Instead of blindly Googling for an answer, we imagine that Oscar itself can be your first point of contact. You could even think of it like foursquare’s “Explore”: before you go somewhere, use the search and allow it to pass you to the right spot. The mechanics of how this works are hidden behind the scenes in order to keep the interface simple, but the idea is that it will use basic information about each provider to point you to the right place. Over time, we imagine this system can get better as more data points and views from your friends are added in. “Show me only doctors that can speak Spanish.” – “Go here because many people your age go here.” – “Show me only providers that have many years of experience and happen to be tech-savvy, too.” Why should a health insurance company only step in at the very end of care? (That is: at the point where care has already been delivered and the insurer only steps in to pay your bill for you.) The idea instead is that when you need help, you ask us and we point you to an appropriate place of care that not only solves your needs but also does it transparently.

    The “Doctor on Call” - this one is something we are really proud of and excited about. Some of us were lucky enough to grow up with a family doctor who would be able to answer simple questions over the phone: helping you get care and saving you time from having to drive out to the doctor’s office and taking a couple of hours out of your work day. Whatever happened to those days? Oscar’s “Doctor on Call” does exactly this. We’ve partnered with Teladoc and their physician network to provide this service. So, at any time, no matter where you are (in the U.S.), you’ll be able to ring up a doctor and talk to them about a problem you have. The doctor will be able to recommend a solution, prescribe you medicine or, in cases where a further in-person visit is needed, send you to a specialist to get care. And the best part: all this is free for members. We could have pointed members to independent applications out there now that seem to do this, but we wanted to embed this experience natively into Oscar itself. This way, you never have to leave this ecosystem and use yet another login to use such a system. And by seamlessly integrating this, we could also hide the costs and make it free for you in a much easier way.

    All-in-all, this is just the start of even deeper products and issues Oscar can solve.

    The appeal in Oscar is not only that we get to see through 2014 eyes and solve all the things that incumbents have trouble solving. Or the fact that we can bring a tech-focused approach and solutions to the health care space. To me, the most exciting is that by starting over from scratch, we have the ability to write a new playbook on how a health insurance company should work. We have a chance to provide additional features and services that customers have not expected before. We have the ability to start your care and our relationship with you not after you get hurt and after you’ve been fixed up by the doctor, but rather by being the first point of contact when you do need care. And perhaps, someday, so easy we will even get one step ahead of you and actively alert you to offer you services before you come to realize you need them.

    Building a health insurance company anew from the ground up for the 21st century is a huge undertaking. But one that has consumers and technology (web and mobile) as part of its core value proposition and product strategy is refreshing. The way it should be, as it is done in most other industries.

    -cch

     
  6. 12:53 1st Feb 2014

    Notes: 1057

    Reblogged from johngushue

    Tags: healthdietnutritionfood

    image: Download

    johngushue:

Here’s a chart that scarily sums up what’s out of whack with our diet. 

You are what you eat. And many Americans unfortunately are overweight or obese. Food is just one part of the health equation, but a big one. -cch

    johngushue:

    Here’s a chart that scarily sums up what’s out of whack with our diet. 

    You are what you eat. And many Americans unfortunately are overweight or obese. Food is just one part of the health equation, but a big one.

    -cch

     
  7. 11:03 10th Dec 2013

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from indianqb18

    Tags: healthcarehealth

    people are very open to the idea of anonymously sharing their health records or genetic information, with more than three-quarters of respondents over the age of 55 saying that they would be open to sharing lab tests and health monitoring data
    — 

    isaac lopez

    new technologies can bring decision support, health monitoring and health coaches into the home. it was also interesting to see that people in emerging markets such as Brazil, China and India trusted themselves to use health monitoring technologies more than those in more technologically advanced economies such as Japan and the United States.

    (via indianqb18)

    Interesting study findings and a reminder that while the US is a leader in many ways, it can still learn from others, particularly when it comes to health and healthcare.

    -cch

     
  8. Where do health care dollars go? This is where.

    -cch

     
  9. 10:04 15th Sep 2013

    Notes: 31

    Reblogged from bijan

    Tags: healthdietnutrition

    If you said to me, go and design a Diabetes store, I would just take you to the supermarket
    — The World Is Fucking Insane — Health & The Future — Medium (via bijan)

    Great post from Nick here. Doing good things with Sessions.

     
  10. jayparkinsonmd:

    My friends at Collaborative Fund made a video about Sherpaa and the reasons why we built this wonderful company. I really just want to delight people and inspire you to be healthy— something that’s unheard of in today’s version of healthcare.

    Great company, mission… and video.

    Here’s to a bright future for Jay & Co and also other healthcare entrepreneurs using technology to provide more efficient, effective, and quality care to the masses.

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  11. Eat real food, as close to nature as possible. It’s what we do to food that is a problem — processing, refining, reducing and altering in general. Forget about reduced fat and skim milk. The less processing the better. If you’re going to eat fat, choose good quality and go for full-fat. Eat avocados, use olive oil or coconut oil (yes coconut oil is healthy) in cooking, have nuts, wild salmon, grass-fed butter, and pastured grass-fed beef.

    I think that reduced-fat foods, particularly skim milk, nonfat yogurt, etc. are a slippery slope. When you remove the fat content from one cup of milk, you lose a significant volume, which means it’s replaced with milk that has a higher concentration of sugar to fat ratio. It’s not the fat in milk that makes us fat. It’s the sugar.

    — 

    A Chef and Doctor Talk About Butter 

    Medium is on a roll (not the dinner kind) with some great content lately. This conversation between a chef and a doctor is no exception. If it were food, it’d be calorically dense and nutritious. 

    (via chriskurdziel)

    Yes. Here’s to unprocessed food for better health for all.

    -cch

    (Source: zeb)

     
  12. Very interesting health/nutrition infographic which for those of you who have seen the movies Food Inc and Forks Over Knives already know many of these themes and takeaways. We humans should eat less meat and instead eat more plants, fruits, whole grains and unprocessed foods. A simple way to do the latter is to only allow yourself to consume a food or drink where its contents and ingredients you can’t pronounce or need a PhD to understand what it actually is once or twice a day max!

    To your health,

    Charles

    (Source: lucidty)

     
  13. image: Download

    amprog:

Healthcare costs are growing slower now than any point in past 5 decades. via The Washington Post

Interesting data on healthcare spending. I’m betting there will be an uptick though in the next 3-5 years though as the economy stabilizes and consumer confidence increases. -cch

    amprog:

    Healthcare costs are growing slower now than any point in past 5 decades. via The Washington Post

    Interesting data on healthcare spending. I’m betting there will be an uptick though in the next 3-5 years though as the economy stabilizes and consumer confidence increases.

    -cch

     
  14. image: Download

    jayparkinsonmd:

Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 
I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 
It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 
It’s a classic disruptive innovation. 
I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.
My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature  enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness. -cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 

    I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 

    It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 

    It’s a classic disruptive innovation

    I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.

    My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

    Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness.

    -cch

     
  15. image: Download

    US #healthcare - broken down into dollars & (non) cents. 

Needless to say, our costs and outcomes per dollar spent are not sustainable. 

-cch

    US #healthcare - broken down into dollars & (non) cents.

    Needless to say, our costs and outcomes per dollar spent are not sustainable.

    -cch