1. 18:38 11th Jun 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from oscarhealth

    Tags: healthcarehealth

    oscarhealth:

    Covering a new generation of uninsured.

    Great piece here on Oscar - health insurance for the now generation.

    -cch

     
  2. 12:44 7th Feb 2014

    Notes: 44

    Reblogged from oscarhealth

    Tags: healthcarehealthinnovation

    image: Download

    naveen:

What I’ve been doing at Oscar.
These past few months, I have been helping a couple of startups I like.
Sometimes, I have been investing in them. (Well, I’m trying to: I am basically making it up and learning as I go along, but it could be argued that’s what all angel investing really is about.)
Sometimes, I have been spending time hanging out at a company and helping more directly.
But regardless of whether I invest or help a team more directly, I think the way I’ve been thinking about it is to only get involved in projects that I wish I myself had started. (Max Levchin said it best: “One of the best heuristics I found when deciding to invest [in] a startup is whether I would seriously consider joining it, if asked.”).
The company that I’ve spent the most time with recently is Oscar Health: I’ve been here for the last five months.
If you know me, you already know I’ve been curious about and playing around in the health space. My hacking around in the quantified self space brought me to personal health, which is basically the idea of using tools (either built by the community or by health & fitness companies) to take charge of our own health. This personal health movement can be thought of one model where care is proactive rather than reactive. All this got me closer to learning about where the healthcare system is really broken and needs technology’s help the most.
That, of course, brought me to Oscar. I had already known the guys before they got started and I was always excited about the possibilities anytime we got together to talk about the idea of starting an insurance company. If you want, think of my exploration as a see-saw: “things that we do for ourselves” on the left and “things a care provider does for us” on the right. I started on the left and I slowly started learning and moving right. And then I figured I should skip ahead and jump all the way to the right and see the world from Oscar’s perspective.
I’ve been helping Oscar in various roles: with recruiting for different parts of the team (mainly on the product and engineering sides); with general company “things” (helping with PR/marketing, with process, organizing engineering and recruiting meets, &c.).
I also spent a lot of time helping build different parts of the product:
The mobile experience - of course, this one was easy. Many of our members are young and tech-savvy and almost always on their mobile phones. They order food, their cabs, buy movie tickets, read the news, see train times, search for things exclusively on mobile. So why shouldn’t they have a great experience where their healthcare questions and delivery also happens on mobile? I made this a big priority for the team for the January 1st launch: we worked nights and days with a very tiny team. And, in something like eight weeks, we put together a great Oscar Member app for iOS. (Yes, Android at some point very soon!).
The care finder - this tool can be thought of as your first point of contact when you look to solve an issue in health for yourself or a family member. Instead of blindly Googling for an answer, we imagine that Oscar itself can be your first point of contact. You could even think of it like foursquare’s “Explore”: before you go somewhere, use the search and allow it to pass you to the right spot. The mechanics of how this works are hidden behind the scenes in order to keep the interface simple, but the idea is that it will use basic information about each provider to point you to the right place. Over time, we imagine this system can get better as more data points and views from your friends are added in. “Show me only doctors that can speak Spanish.” – “Go here because many people your age go here.” – “Show me only providers that have many years of experience and happen to be tech-savvy, too.” Why should a health insurance company only step in at the very end of care? (That is: at the point where care has already been delivered and the insurer only steps in to pay your bill for you.) The idea instead is that when you need help, you ask us and we point you to an appropriate place of care that not only solves your needs but also does it transparently.
The “Doctor on Call” - this one is something we are really proud of and excited about. Some of us were lucky enough to grow up with a family doctor who would be able to answer simple questions over the phone: helping you get care and saving you time from having to drive out to the doctor’s office and taking a couple of hours out of your work day. Whatever happened to those days? Oscar’s “Doctor on Call” does exactly this. We’ve partnered with Teladoc and their physician network to provide this service. So, at any time, no matter where you are (in the U.S.), you’ll be able to ring up a doctor and talk to them about a problem you have. The doctor will be able to recommend a solution, prescribe you medicine or, in cases where a further in-person visit is needed, send you to a specialist to get care. And the best part: all this is free for members. We could have pointed members to independent applications out there now that seem to do this, but we wanted to embed this experience natively into Oscar itself. This way, you never have to leave this ecosystem and use yet another login to use such a system. And by seamlessly integrating this, we could also hide the costs and make it free for you in a much easier way.
All-in-all, this is just the start of even deeper products and issues Oscar can solve.
The appeal in Oscar is not only that we get to see through 2014 eyes and solve all the things that incumbents have trouble solving. Or the fact that we can bring a tech-focused approach and solutions to the health care space. To me, the most exciting is that by starting over from scratch, we have the ability to write a new playbook on how a health insurance company should work. We have a chance to provide additional features and services that customers have not expected before. We have the ability to start your care and our relationship with you not after you get hurt and after you’ve been fixed up by the doctor, but rather by being the first point of contact when you do need care. And perhaps, someday, so easy we will even get one step ahead of you and actively alert you to offer you services before you come to realize you need them.

Building a health insurance company anew from the ground up for the 21st century is a huge undertaking. But one that has consumers and technology (web and mobile) as part of its core value proposition and product strategy  is refreshing. The way it should be, as it is done in most other industries. -cch

    naveen:

    What I’ve been doing at Oscar.

    These past few months, I have been helping a couple of startups I like.

    Sometimes, I have been investing in them. (Well, I’m trying to: I am basically making it up and learning as I go along, but it could be argued that’s what all angel investing really is about.)

    Sometimes, I have been spending time hanging out at a company and helping more directly.

    But regardless of whether I invest or help a team more directly, I think the way I’ve been thinking about it is to only get involved in projects that I wish I myself had started. (Max Levchin said it best: “One of the best heuristics I found when deciding to invest [in] a startup is whether I would seriously consider joining it, if asked.”).

    The company that I’ve spent the most time with recently is Oscar Health: I’ve been here for the last five months.

    If you know me, you already know I’ve been curious about and playing around in the health space. My hacking around in the quantified self space brought me to personal health, which is basically the idea of using tools (either built by the community or by health & fitness companies) to take charge of our own health. This personal health movement can be thought of one model where care is proactive rather than reactive. All this got me closer to learning about where the healthcare system is really broken and needs technology’s help the most.

    That, of course, brought me to Oscar. I had already known the guys before they got started and I was always excited about the possibilities anytime we got together to talk about the idea of starting an insurance company. If you want, think of my exploration as a see-saw: “things that we do for ourselves” on the left and “things a care provider does for us” on the right. I started on the left and I slowly started learning and moving right. And then I figured I should skip ahead and jump all the way to the right and see the world from Oscar’s perspective.

    I’ve been helping Oscar in various roles: with recruiting for different parts of the team (mainly on the product and engineering sides); with general company “things” (helping with PR/marketing, with process, organizing engineering and recruiting meets, &c.).

    I also spent a lot of time helping build different parts of the product:

    The mobile experience - of course, this one was easy. Many of our members are young and tech-savvy and almost always on their mobile phones. They order food, their cabs, buy movie tickets, read the news, see train times, search for things exclusively on mobile. So why shouldn’t they have a great experience where their healthcare questions and delivery also happens on mobile? I made this a big priority for the team for the January 1st launch: we worked nights and days with a very tiny team. And, in something like eight weeks, we put together a great Oscar Member app for iOS. (Yes, Android at some point very soon!).

    The care finder - this tool can be thought of as your first point of contact when you look to solve an issue in health for yourself or a family member. Instead of blindly Googling for an answer, we imagine that Oscar itself can be your first point of contact. You could even think of it like foursquare’s “Explore”: before you go somewhere, use the search and allow it to pass you to the right spot. The mechanics of how this works are hidden behind the scenes in order to keep the interface simple, but the idea is that it will use basic information about each provider to point you to the right place. Over time, we imagine this system can get better as more data points and views from your friends are added in. “Show me only doctors that can speak Spanish.” – “Go here because many people your age go here.” – “Show me only providers that have many years of experience and happen to be tech-savvy, too.” Why should a health insurance company only step in at the very end of care? (That is: at the point where care has already been delivered and the insurer only steps in to pay your bill for you.) The idea instead is that when you need help, you ask us and we point you to an appropriate place of care that not only solves your needs but also does it transparently.

    The “Doctor on Call” - this one is something we are really proud of and excited about. Some of us were lucky enough to grow up with a family doctor who would be able to answer simple questions over the phone: helping you get care and saving you time from having to drive out to the doctor’s office and taking a couple of hours out of your work day. Whatever happened to those days? Oscar’s “Doctor on Call” does exactly this. We’ve partnered with Teladoc and their physician network to provide this service. So, at any time, no matter where you are (in the U.S.), you’ll be able to ring up a doctor and talk to them about a problem you have. The doctor will be able to recommend a solution, prescribe you medicine or, in cases where a further in-person visit is needed, send you to a specialist to get care. And the best part: all this is free for members. We could have pointed members to independent applications out there now that seem to do this, but we wanted to embed this experience natively into Oscar itself. This way, you never have to leave this ecosystem and use yet another login to use such a system. And by seamlessly integrating this, we could also hide the costs and make it free for you in a much easier way.

    All-in-all, this is just the start of even deeper products and issues Oscar can solve.

    The appeal in Oscar is not only that we get to see through 2014 eyes and solve all the things that incumbents have trouble solving. Or the fact that we can bring a tech-focused approach and solutions to the health care space. To me, the most exciting is that by starting over from scratch, we have the ability to write a new playbook on how a health insurance company should work. We have a chance to provide additional features and services that customers have not expected before. We have the ability to start your care and our relationship with you not after you get hurt and after you’ve been fixed up by the doctor, but rather by being the first point of contact when you do need care. And perhaps, someday, so easy we will even get one step ahead of you and actively alert you to offer you services before you come to realize you need them.

    Building a health insurance company anew from the ground up for the 21st century is a huge undertaking. But one that has consumers and technology (web and mobile) as part of its core value proposition and product strategy is refreshing. The way it should be, as it is done in most other industries.

    -cch

     
  3. image: Download

    How will technology change healthcare? The same way technology has facilitated the move of many transactions from being required in-person (shopping at the mall, playing a board game) to remote via the Internet and mobile technologies (Amazon, WordsWithFriends, Xbox Live multiplayer).  This tidal wave of disruption has not saturated healthcare as it has other industries as of yet, but it will.  It’s taking longer due to established and entrenched institutions like hospitals and providers, a more complex regulatory environment, (payment, privacy), and the fact that most healthcare transactions are not direct or full financial interactions between supplier (doctors) and consumers (patients).  Thanks to health insurance, most consumers don’t know what it actually costs to see and pay a doctor full-price for a check-up or an MRI (although this is changing with more US consumers enrolled in plans with higher deductibles, requiring individuals pay out of pocket for health costs up to a certain threshold before insurance kicks in).  However, it’s clear that technology is starting  to impact how healthcare is delivered and consumed in the US today (no comment on healthcare.gov). While B2C applications are proliferating, much of the value and spend is still on the B2B side that impact providers (EMR spend is a $21B market). There will be a tipping point as they say, and change is coming that will put more and more power in the hand of consumers.  It will soon be hard to ignore the use of more effective and efficient technology in healthcare delivery, no matter the perspective of provider, patient or payor.  However, despite many who think technology can and will solve all ills in healthcare, it’s worth keeping a healthy perspective— technology can and will plan an important role in supporting healthcare, enabling medicine to be less art and more science through accessibility of timely and rich information to make more accurate diagnoses and deliver more effective treatments.  There will be many things a computer or robot might be able to treat in the near future, such as the estimated 70% of doctor visits that are “routine” cases such as coughs, colds, headaches and can be handled via phone or video or e-mail.  This will allow doctors to spend more time with patients that are more complex and require more time to assess, diagnose and treat such as those with co-morbid and chronic conditions.  At the end of the day, there will always be a need for the human touch in medicine.   
To your health,
-cch

The attached infographic provides a visual depiction of results from a recent survey of 10,000 U.S. physicians conducted by Nuance. The survey found that 80% of U.S. physicians believe virtual assistants will drastically change healthcare by 2018.
A link to another article on Nuance’s Healthcare blog can be found here: 
http://whatsnext.nuance.com/florence-nightingale-see-us-now/

    How will technology change healthcare? The same way technology has facilitated the move of many transactions from being required in-person (shopping at the mall, playing a board game) to remote via the Internet and mobile technologies (Amazon, WordsWithFriends, Xbox Live multiplayer).  This tidal wave of disruption has not saturated healthcare as it has other industries as of yet, but it will.  It’s taking longer due to established and entrenched institutions like hospitals and providers, a more complex regulatory environment, (payment, privacy), and the fact that most healthcare transactions are not direct or full financial interactions between supplier (doctors) and consumers (patients).  Thanks to health insurance, most consumers don’t know what it actually costs to see and pay a doctor full-price for a check-up or an MRI (although this is changing with more US consumers enrolled in plans with higher deductibles, requiring individuals pay out of pocket for health costs up to a certain threshold before insurance kicks in).  However, it’s clear that technology is starting  to impact how healthcare is delivered and consumed in the US today (no comment on healthcare.gov). While B2C applications are proliferating, much of the value and spend is still on the B2B side that impact providers (EMR spend is a $21B market). There will be a tipping point as they say, and change is coming that will put more and more power in the hand of consumers.  It will soon be hard to ignore the use of more effective and efficient technology in healthcare delivery, no matter the perspective of provider, patient or payor.  However, despite many who think technology can and will solve all ills in healthcare, it’s worth keeping a healthy perspective— technology can and will plan an important role in supporting healthcare, enabling medicine to be less art and more science through accessibility of timely and rich information to make more accurate diagnoses and deliver more effective treatments.  There will be many things a computer or robot might be able to treat in the near future, such as the estimated 70% of doctor visits that are “routine” cases such as coughs, colds, headaches and can be handled via phone or video or e-mail.  This will allow doctors to spend more time with patients that are more complex and require more time to assess, diagnose and treat such as those with co-morbid and chronic conditions.  At the end of the day, there will always be a need for the human touch in medicine.   

    To your health,

    -cch

    The attached infographic provides a visual depiction of results from a recent survey of 10,000 U.S. physicians conducted by Nuance. The survey found that 80% of U.S. physicians believe virtual assistants will drastically change healthcare by 2018.

    A link to another article on Nuance’s Healthcare blog can be found here: 

    http://whatsnext.nuance.com/florence-nightingale-see-us-now/

     
  4. 11:03 10th Dec 2013

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from indianqb18

    Tags: healthcarehealth

    people are very open to the idea of anonymously sharing their health records or genetic information, with more than three-quarters of respondents over the age of 55 saying that they would be open to sharing lab tests and health monitoring data
    — 

    isaac lopez

    new technologies can bring decision support, health monitoring and health coaches into the home. it was also interesting to see that people in emerging markets such as Brazil, China and India trusted themselves to use health monitoring technologies more than those in more technologically advanced economies such as Japan and the United States.

    (via indianqb18)

    Interesting study findings and a reminder that while the US is a leader in many ways, it can still learn from others, particularly when it comes to health and healthcare.

    -cch

     
  5. This is a revolutionary shift. Once upon a time, medicine was a discipline based on the nuanced diagnosis and treatment of sick patients. Now, Big Data, networked computers and a culture obsessed with knowing its numbers have moved medicine from the bedside to the desktop (or laptop). The art of medicine is becoming the science of an insurance actuary.
    — Statins by Numbers - NYTimes.com (via fred-wilson)

    Truth: “The art of medicine is becoming the science of an insurance actuary”. However, it’s necessary to never forget the human element in the ultimate delivery of care - it cannot ever be just all (cold) hard numbers.

    -cch

     
  6. Where do health care dollars go? This is where.

    -cch

     
  7. jayparkinsonmd:

    My friends at Collaborative Fund made a video about Sherpaa and the reasons why we built this wonderful company. I really just want to delight people and inspire you to be healthy— something that’s unheard of in today’s version of healthcare.

    Great company, mission… and video.

    Here’s to a bright future for Jay & Co and also other healthcare entrepreneurs using technology to provide more efficient, effective, and quality care to the masses.

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  8. collaborativefund:

    by
    Founder/CEO at Collaborative Fund

    In San Francisco, you can find the “Airbnb-of-everything.” Just as Airbnb capitalized on the fact that many of us have a spare bed, bedroom, or even apartment from which we’d gladly make some money, many other industries have…

    Times… they (and industries and cultures) certainly are a-changing thanks to confluence of Internet + technology + social + mobile.

    Personally, I’m waiting and hoping that they most radically impact healthcare (including food/nutrition), education, and energy above all.

    -cch

    (Source: collaborativefund)

     
  9. image: Download

    amprog:

Healthcare costs are growing slower now than any point in past 5 decades. via The Washington Post

Interesting data on healthcare spending. I’m betting there will be an uptick though in the next 3-5 years though as the economy stabilizes and consumer confidence increases. -cch

    amprog:

    Healthcare costs are growing slower now than any point in past 5 decades. via The Washington Post

    Interesting data on healthcare spending. I’m betting there will be an uptick though in the next 3-5 years though as the economy stabilizes and consumer confidence increases.

    -cch

     
  10. image: Download

    US #healthcare - broken down into dollars & (non) cents. 

Needless to say, our costs and outcomes per dollar spent are not sustainable. 

-cch

    US #healthcare - broken down into dollars & (non) cents.

    Needless to say, our costs and outcomes per dollar spent are not sustainable.

    -cch

     
  11. image: Download

    jayparkinsonmd:

theweekmagazine:

Our newest infographic features some pretty shocking facts about our plastic surgery obsession. For example, teenage plastic surgery is on the rise. There were 14,000 procedures performed on teens in 1996, compared to 77,000 in 2011.
More…

Super interesting on many levels, especially regarding the cost of these procedures. For example, an appendectomy at an outpatient surgical center costs $47,000 and takes 45 minutes or so to do by a general surgeon. The cost of a facelift, done by a highly skilled plastic surgeon, can take hours. 
This is what happens when competition and paying for something with your own money, not an insurance company’s money, infiltrates healthcare. Costs decrease significantly and they mimic the actual cost of a procedure, not some arbitrary, highly inflated number.

* * *
This is evidence that US healthcare costs (prices alone) aren’t spiraling out of control when there isn’t a financial intermediary (health insurance or employer coverage) between the consumer and the provider.   The same trend on healthcare prices for lasik eye surgery has been well documented.  Unfortunately, total healthcare costs are a function of price times volume.  And holistically speaking, plastic surgery costs are increasing markedly in the US due to increased utilization.
-cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    theweekmagazine:

    Our newest infographic features some pretty shocking facts about our plastic surgery obsession. For example, teenage plastic surgery is on the rise. There were 14,000 procedures performed on teens in 1996, compared to 77,000 in 2011.

    More…

    Super interesting on many levels, especially regarding the cost of these procedures. For example, an appendectomy at an outpatient surgical center costs $47,000 and takes 45 minutes or so to do by a general surgeon. The cost of a facelift, done by a highly skilled plastic surgeon, can take hours. 

    This is what happens when competition and paying for something with your own money, not an insurance company’s money, infiltrates healthcare. Costs decrease significantly and they mimic the actual cost of a procedure, not some arbitrary, highly inflated number.

    * * *

    This is evidence that US healthcare costs (prices alone) aren’t spiraling out of control when there isn’t a financial intermediary (health insurance or employer coverage) between the consumer and the provider.   The same trend on healthcare prices for lasik eye surgery has been well documented.  Unfortunately, total healthcare costs are a function of price times volume.  And holistically speaking, plastic surgery costs are increasing markedly in the US due to increased utilization.

    -cch

    (Source: theweek.com)

     
  12. The US is #1… in per capita costs.
    But we aren’t #1 in outcomes.
    This article dives into some of the specifics. We need to improve both - costs and outcomes.

    -cch

     
  13. image: Download

    A new report released today on healthcare costs indicates prices are mainly to blame for the increase in healthcare spending.  Interestingly enough, the report used data from the largest health insurance companies in America who participated in the effort.  You can download the free report from the Health Care Cost Institute here.
-cch

    A new report released today on healthcare costs indicates prices are mainly to blame for the increase in healthcare spending.  Interestingly enough, the report used data from the largest health insurance companies in America who participated in the effort.  You can download the free report from the Health Care Cost Institute here.

    -cch

     
  14. Excellent article about the US healthcare system and analysis of our spend problem in the context of our friends around the world. We need to fix this problem ASAP, as the author rightly points out - it impacts our national security and fiscal viability.

    -cch

     
  15. Data, Design, Diabetes innovation challenge, Wednesday 05/16 @ the Blueprint Health offices in NYC!  And don’t forget for those healthtech or digital health innovators out there, Blueprint is accepting applications now for the 2nd accelerator class starting July 23rd.

    Spread the word… diabetes is a huge problem impacting our country on so many levels, and we need people from multidisciplinary backgrounds involved in helping develop solutions!

    -cch

    startuphealth:

    Data Design Diabetes is a next-generation challenge that casts a wide net to the innovator community to find a breakthrough in improving the quality, delivery, and cost of care, to help millions of Americans living with diabetes. Demo Day will provide an opportunity to learn more…