1. image: Download

    jayparkinsonmd:

Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 
I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 
It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 
It’s a classic disruptive innovation. 
I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.
My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature  enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness. -cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 

    I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 

    It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 

    It’s a classic disruptive innovation

    I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.

    My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

    Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness.

    -cch

     
  2. Thank goodness, exercise and fitness equipment has advanced rapidly through the years so we don’t have to work out on things like this!  For those who know me, I’m a health/fitness buff and definitely enjoy a good workout (through sports like soccer or basketball) or at the gym.
I’m thrilled there are lots of new devices and gadgets out there to get other folks interested in health and fitness, be it current or ex-athletes or elderly folks.  Like many electronic gadgets though, there is a balance between marketing and actual results. 
As this article shows, while technology is improving, the technology behind many of these fitness tracking consumer electronics devices isn’t perfected yet and are variable. 
So before you tweet that next count of steps or calories burned… just know that any movement is better than no movement.
To your health,
-cch

    Thank goodness, exercise and fitness equipment has advanced rapidly through the years so we don’t have to work out on things like this!  For those who know me, I’m a health/fitness buff and definitely enjoy a good workout (through sports like soccer or basketball) or at the gym.

    I’m thrilled there are lots of new devices and gadgets out there to get other folks interested in health and fitness, be it current or ex-athletes or elderly folks.  Like many electronic gadgets though, there is a balance between marketing and actual results. 

    As this article shows, while technology is improving, the technology behind many of these fitness tracking consumer electronics devices isn’t perfected yet and are variable. 

    So before you tweet that next count of steps or calories burned… just know that any movement is better than no movement.

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  3. Excellent coverage of the leading mhealth products on the market for the quantified self fanatics out there.  This is a thorough review primarily of the Jawbone UP, but comparisons to the Nike Fuelband and FitBit are also included. The review is comprehensive, covering both the device itself (physical form factor, features) and the UI/UX (with the device and app).

    -cch

     
  4.  NikeFuelBand

    Needless to say, it’s sporty, well-designed… and looks pretty cool.  Game on for quantified self!  I anticipate an innovative and creative marketing campaign as well, as evidenced by this clip here

    -cch 

     
  5. QS

    Excellent article covering the self-tracking data space.  Lots of gadgets out there.  The number of data sources and streams going forward will increase.  There will be an opportunity for a platform to aggregate, synthesize, and share in an intelligent and easy UI/UX way.  

    -cch