1. brentgrinna:

    image

    There has been a lot of commentary recently stating that MBAs, and Harvard MBAs specifically, aren’t very good startup founders.

    Only 12 of the 39 companies had any MBAs within their co-founding teams…only three had at least one co-founder who went to HBS.” – Dan Primack of Fortune

    “I would bet a large amount of money that the overwhelming majority of us would not look favorably on a company started by one of you” - Chamath Palihapitiya on Harvard MBAs

    Yes! Fantastic data… and while VC fundraising isn’t necessarily a sign of business success, given the status of several of these companies growth and revenue wise, odds are there will be at least a few good outcomes in this batch. And kudos to b-schools for adapting their teaching and curriculum in recent years to promote more “non-traditional” MBA careers such as technology and entrepreneurship.

    -cch

     
  2. jayparkinsonmd:

    My friends at Collaborative Fund made a video about Sherpaa and the reasons why we built this wonderful company. I really just want to delight people and inspire you to be healthy— something that’s unheard of in today’s version of healthcare.

    Great company, mission… and video.

    Here’s to a bright future for Jay & Co and also other healthcare entrepreneurs using technology to provide more efficient, effective, and quality care to the masses.

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  3. 08:25 12th Jul 2013

    Notes: 43

    Reblogged from bijan

    Tags: startupsTVstart-upsVC

    bijan:

    Over the last week, Microsoft announced that it was shutting down MSN TV which was came from their acqusition of WebTV Networks back in 1997.

    And during that same week, Samsung acquired Boxee.

    I thought I would share some thoughts since I worked at WebTV before and after the acquisition…

    Great and insightful post Bijan. Congrats to Avner & the Boxee team… truly a great guy.

    -cch

     
  4. In the connected world in which we live, the difference between average content and bad content is hardly noticeable. In fact, the difference between good content and bad content is not that big. Truly, the only thing that really gets rewarded is remarkable content. If you’re investing in content production, always invest in the most amazing, ballsy, exceptional content that you can get your hands on because if you build it, they won’t come. This quote sums things up for me:

    We’ve tried to work longer on stories for greater impact, and publish fewer quick-takes that we know you can consume elsewhere. We’re actually publishing, on average, roughly one-third fewer posts on Salon than we were a year ago (from 848 to 572 in December; 943 to 602 in January). So: 33 percent fewer posts; 40 percent greater traffic – source

    — 

    The Time For Content Marketing Is Now | distilled (via khuyi)

    This is so true.  While I do not wish to slam the host of startups that are looking to automate “content marketing”, the fact is that great, original content:

    1) Takes time

    2) Requires vision

    3) Necessitates risk

    That is not something that can be created by a bot.  It is not something that an algorithm can replace or make more efficient.  While cultivating a strategy and ethos of quality content may not yield the quick hits or instant recognition, in the long run it is a strategy that will yield the greatest gains.

    (via marksbirch)

    Great insight here.
    Don’t post just to post. Have meaning behind your content so others can pick up the signal in the midst of all that noise.

    -cch

     
  5. image: Download

    marksbirch:

WHERE DO STARTUPS WORK IN NYC?
The explosion in co-working and accelerators over the past five years has been remarkable.  To keep track of all of these locations, I put together a list in 2010 that quickly became outdated, so I put together a new list of NYC Accelerators, Incubators, and Co-working spaces in 2012 that I regularly update (if I missed any, please let me know!)
There are also several other great resources provided by NYCEDC, Crain’s NYC (and a nifty map), and Charles Bonello with more detailed information than my simple directory.  The great thing is that if you are looking for an office or facility to work out of, you have an enormous selection to choose from with over 100 working spaces covering a wide breadth of industries from arts to biotech to food to tech.  It truly is a great time to start a company here in NYC with the variety and affordability of office space throughout the metro area.
If you have a hankering for starting up someplace else however, you might want to check this global directory of accelerators and incubators on LAUNCH.  We still think NYC is best though!
nycedc:

In 2008, New Work City launched the first co-working space in NYC which provided office space for people who work from home, freelancers, and entrepreneurs. Today, there are over 100 co-working spaces in the City including incubator and accelerator programs with even more on the way. Read more at Crain’s

“(Incubators) are tapping into incredible demand from entrepreneurs and from people in a freelance economy. From the city’s perspective, with the Wall Street meltdown in 2008, it became incredibly clear that Wall Street was not going to save the day and that New York really needed to add balance to its economy and identify a new source for growth.”
- Jonathan Bowles, the executive director of Center for an Urban Future.

Learn more about some of the incubator spaces available here in NYC.


Great list of NYC start-up work places and resources here. Also excited to see some familiar friends and new ones this evening while judging finalist start-ups at the NYCEDC Innovate Health Tech NYC 2013 Demo Day at We Work Labs in SoHo! -cch

    marksbirch:

    WHERE DO STARTUPS WORK IN NYC?

    The explosion in co-working and accelerators over the past five years has been remarkable.  To keep track of all of these locations, I put together a list in 2010 that quickly became outdated, so I put together a new list of NYC Accelerators, Incubators, and Co-working spaces in 2012 that I regularly update (if I missed any, please let me know!)

    There are also several other great resources provided by NYCEDC, Crain’s NYC (and a nifty map), and Charles Bonello with more detailed information than my simple directory.  The great thing is that if you are looking for an office or facility to work out of, you have an enormous selection to choose from with over 100 working spaces covering a wide breadth of industries from arts to biotech to food to tech.  It truly is a great time to start a company here in NYC with the variety and affordability of office space throughout the metro area.

    If you have a hankering for starting up someplace else however, you might want to check this global directory of accelerators and incubators on LAUNCH.  We still think NYC is best though!

    nycedc:

    In 2008, New Work City launched the first co-working space in NYC which provided office space for people who work from home, freelancers, and entrepreneurs. Today, there are over 100 co-working spaces in the City including incubator and accelerator programs with even more on the way. Read more at Crain’s

    “(Incubators) are tapping into incredible demand from entrepreneurs and from people in a freelance economy. From the city’s perspective, with the Wall Street meltdown in 2008, it became incredibly clear that Wall Street was not going to save the day and that New York really needed to add balance to its economy and identify a new source for growth.”

    Jonathan Bowles, the executive director of Center for an Urban Future.

    Learn more about some of the incubator spaces available here in NYC.

    Great list of NYC start-up work places and resources here. Also excited to see some familiar friends and new ones this evening while judging finalist start-ups at the NYCEDC Innovate Health Tech NYC 2013 Demo Day at We Work Labs in SoHo!

    -cch

     
  6. continuations:

    At the height of the re-engineering craze there was one fantastic HBR article titled “Re-engineering Work: Don’t Automate, Obliterate.” In light of the changes in the labor market the choice of “obliterate” may now seem unfortunate, but the basic point of the article was spot on: don’t implement…

    Nice read and perspective here on innovation and competitive advantage, for both young and big mature companies alike. The trick of course, is to SUSTAIN competitive advantage in the face of fluid and rapidly changing technology and market forces (including regulation/policy and macroeconomic condition of the financial markets, domestic and international).

    -cch

     
  7. toddwickersty:

    But I’m a user first and that’s the main reason why I care what happens to it. I’m skeptical if Yahoo! does take it over. It’s super easy to be skeptical for obvious reasons, but I think it’s a good time for Tumblr to sell. I know if it does happen, I’ll continue to use it…

    Good perspective here on Tumblr community and being mindful of product and customer/community culture. I do not disagree.

    HOWEVER let’s be real and clear about the essential truth of the matter: no one person, not any single person (regardless of whether a seasoned VC or fellow tried and true entrepreneur) can truly understand the perspective or mindset of the founder(s) of this (or any) particular start-up company. There are ups and downs in any startup life, but there is also the personal history and dynamic that NO ONE can relate to except THE PERSON (PEOPLE) in THOSE shoes at THAT time.

    I love social media (and Tumblr obviously) in that it amplifies good and bad in this world and in particular it gives a voice and platform to anyone who wants to share an opinion.

    But let’s be mindful of that - they are individual people’s opinions. The founders of Tumblr or any startup at the end of the day don’t owe anything to their community, their customers, their colleagues or their investors. They owe it to themselves and what they see in the mirror each morning and to their families who have been through the journey with them, supporting them through highs and lows. IF the founders decide (for themselves without outside pressure) that this is the right time to sell and this is the right acquirer and this is the right price…. then let’s cheer and applaud them for a successful journey to date and outcome and wish them well for the future; let’s not second judge or criticize them from afar for timing, for whichever company they sold to, or the price.

    -cch

     
  8. Insightful post by Dave McClure here: VC (r)evolution, geeks got next.  If you are involved in the start-up/innovation ecosystem, this is mandatory summer reading!  Not sure what the VC version of the above is… got to think there could be a few great tries on Draw Something. 
-cch

    Insightful post by Dave McClure here: VC (r)evolution, geeks got next.  If you are involved in the start-up/innovation ecosystem, this is mandatory summer reading!  Not sure what the VC version of the above is… got to think there could be a few great tries on Draw Something

    -cch

     
  9. 09:32 17th Jul 2012

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from marksbirch

    Tags: startupsentrepreneurs

    Great post by Mark on the complicated issues surrounding #startuplife!  Good read for entrepreneurs and investors.

    -cch

    marksbirch:

    Sooner or later you are going to face the truth; the team you start with is not the team you end up with for the long haul. Sometimes it is the direction of the business, sometimes it is personal issues, and sometimes it is just not a combination that is working out. Most founders tend to accept…

     
  10. image: Download

    Are we headed towards a tech bubble? I’m not smart enough to know… but this recent article from the WSJ about the status of start-ups in Silicon Valley is appropriately titled “Appsurd” and might introduce “SoLoMo” into popular lexicon.  And for those who have been around health innovation, investing, and start-ups… we will know the bubblicious-ness of tech has fully saturated healthcare (digital health, healthtech, medtech, whatever you wish to call it) when not only do you hear “it’s this for that”, but “SoLoMo” is then dropped during pitches and it might be high time to flee away screaming!  And yes… you can actually check to see if that crazy start-up or Internet or mobile app business idea is truly legit through ItsThisForThat.com.
-cch

    Are we headed towards a tech bubble? I’m not smart enough to know… but this recent article from the WSJ about the status of start-ups in Silicon Valley is appropriately titled “Appsurd” and might introduce “SoLoMo” into popular lexicon.  And for those who have been around health innovation, investing, and start-ups… we will know the bubblicious-ness of tech has fully saturated healthcare (digital health, healthtech, medtech, whatever you wish to call it) when not only do you hear “it’s this for that”, but “SoLoMo” is then dropped during pitches and it might be high time to flee away screaming!  And yes… you can actually check to see if that crazy start-up or Internet or mobile app business idea is truly legit through ItsThisForThat.com.

    -cch

     
  11. Data, Design, Diabetes innovation challenge, Wednesday 05/16 @ the Blueprint Health offices in NYC!  And don’t forget for those healthtech or digital health innovators out there, Blueprint is accepting applications now for the 2nd accelerator class starting July 23rd.

    Spread the word… diabetes is a huge problem impacting our country on so many levels, and we need people from multidisciplinary backgrounds involved in helping develop solutions!

    -cch

    startuphealth:

    Data Design Diabetes is a next-generation challenge that casts a wide net to the innovator community to find a breakthrough in improving the quality, delivery, and cost of care, to help millions of Americans living with diabetes. Demo Day will provide an opportunity to learn more…
     
  12. Here is a nice post that my buddy & fellow HealthTech enthusiast @Geoffclapp wrote about the healthtech incubator Rock Health in tems of what it strives to do as a program and what he has experienced as an engaged mentor. It’s a rebuttal to a very interesting and uninformed post by MedCityNews the other day disparaging what startup incubators as a whole, and HealthTech ones specifically such as Blueprint Health, Rock Health, and HealthBox are doing to promote innovation and entrepreneurship. Worth the read - but bottom line is that sharing means caring. If you’re really passionate about innovation, you are welcome to trade ideas and participate in pushing this community forward. Everything isn’t peaches and cream and certainly there are many things everyone can do better and there will be hiccups and failures. But don’t sit from the sidelines and be an arm chair quarterback and critic - get in the game and help improve healthcare in this country.

    -cch

     
  13. Blueprint Health Demo Day

    The @bphealth teams have been working hard, if you’re in NYC later this month and interested in HealthTech innovation, come on by! -cch

    startuphealth:

    On Thursday, March 29th - come meet 20 amazing healthcare entrepreneurs who are twelve weeks into building and growing successful healthcare businesses. Join us at Blueprint Health’s SoHo loft as we showcase the inaugural class of Blueprint Health companies and celebrate the rise of NYC as a healthcare innovation hub. Request an invite here.  Space is limited.

     
  14. image: Download

    Post #HIMSS12, where a lot of issues around #health data were discussed, this sums up the big picture: 80% of patient data is unstructured.  Lots of opportunities to mine healthcare “big data” to improve awareness, care, and outcomes.  After a week at social media week NYC - healthcare and then a week at HIMSS, I’m due for a post around a few big takeaways from the past two weeks after a lot of interesting presentations and discussions.  Stay tuned!
-cch
PS. If you missed SMW NYC and the health track, here’s a livestream of one of the panels I put together and moderated - alternative sources of funding for health startups.  

    Post #HIMSS12, where a lot of issues around #health data were discussed, this sums up the big picture: 80% of patient data is unstructured.  Lots of opportunities to mine healthcare “big data” to improve awareness, care, and outcomes.  After a week at social media week NYC - healthcare and then a week at HIMSS, I’m due for a post around a few big takeaways from the past two weeks after a lot of interesting presentations and discussions.  Stay tuned!

    -cch

    PS. If you missed SMW NYC and the health track, here’s a livestream of one of the panels I put together and moderated - alternative sources of funding for health startups.  

     
  15. image: Download

    Great health topics and concepts curated from the always forward thinking Jay Parkinson.
Jumps around a bit topic-wise, but nonetheless very worthwhile to take time to read, digest, and think about the implications for health innovation in 2012+. 
-cch
jayparkinsonmd:

My (health) best of 2011.
One of the questions I ask doctors is “In the past 10 years, what is an innovation that has revolutionized medical practice?” Most of them can’t answer. From a medical perspective, we’re simply stuck with tiny, incremental changes that may or may not change our health for the better. So, with that in mind, I’ve tried to choose the most important health concepts from the past 12 months. Some of them are from other people. Some of them are my own thoughts. Some of them are simply important moments in my own personal health. In no particular order:
Trials and Errors: Why Science is Failing US

Although the scientific process tries to makes sense of problems by isolating every variable—imagining a blood vessel, say, if HDL alone were raised—reality doesn’t work like that. Instead, we live in a world in which everything is knotted together, an impregnable tangle of causes and effects. Even when a system is dissected into its basic parts, those parts are still influenced by a whirligig of forces we can’t understand or haven’t considered or don’t think matter.

How Doctors Die
The nation’s “best” hospitals aren’t even in the top 400 list of safest hospitals.

In the latest advance for health care accountability, the country’s leading hospital accreditation board, the Joint Commission, released a list on Tuesday of 405 medical centers that have been the most diligent in following protocols to treat conditions like heart attack andpneumonia. Almost without exception, most highly regarded hospitals in the United States, from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., did not make the list.

Food Stamps Are Now Worth Double at Farmer’s Markets in Michigan
Real Food is Cheaper than Junk Food
The Easy Way to Stop Smoking
The Hazards of the Couch
The Hot Spotters
A Food Manifesto for the Future
Most Health Solutions Aren’t Medical, They’re Social
Weighing the Evidence on Exercise:

It is extremely unlikely that using exercise or a diet alone will lead to long-term weight loss.Exercise makes you hungry because your body wants to maintain its current state. Guard against eating more because you’re exercising.  Start eating real food and less calories— understand that this is how you will eat from now on. Start exercising. Once you hit your weight goal, continue exercising. Don’t stop. If you don’t change anything about your life, you’ll never weigh less than you do now.

What Happens to Doctors Who Think Outside the Box?
Family Planning as a Cost-Saving Preventive Health Service 

The cost of one Medicaid-covered birth in the United States (including prenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and infant care for 1 year) was $12,613 in 2008, according to estimates from the Guttmacher Institute. The national per-client cost for contraceptive care the same year was $257. In 2008, an estimated $1.9 billion was spent on publicly funded family-planning care — an investment that resulted in an estimated $7 billion in Medicaid savings for the cost of unplanned births.

Coffee vs. Migraines
RIP Dr. Kevorkian
RIP Jack LaLanne
A Measure of My Days: The Journal of a Country Doctor:

Health is not a commodity. Risk factors are not disease. Aging is not an illness. To fix a problem is easy, to sit with another suffering is hard. Doing all we can is not the same as doing what we should. Quality is more than metrics. Patients cannot see outside their pain, we cannot see in, relationship is the only bridge between. Time is precious; we spend it on what we value. The most common condition we treat is unhappiness. And the greatest obstacle to treating a patient’s unhappiness is our own. Nothing is more patient-centered than the process of change. Doctors expect too much from data and not enough from conversation. Community is a locus of healing, not the hospital or the clinic. The foundation of medicine is friendship, conversation and hope.

Wild Food: A tumblr I started because most people have no idea what their food looks like as it’s growing.
Buddycare vs. Humancare
Vaccines Save Lives. End of Story. Part 1 and Part 2.
Everything in Your Environment is Set Up for the Way You Were Before
Introducing my new company, Sherpaa. Launching in just a few weeks.
Doctors of the Future:

We’re a tribe of forward-thinking creative doctors.And we know that the future of healthcare depends on us.We’re the leaders of this revolution.Intrigued? You should be.

One of the best things to happen to me.
Photo by me from many years ago on New Years Eve at Madison Square Garden while listening to Wilco ring in the new year.

    Great health topics and concepts curated from the always forward thinking Jay Parkinson.

    Jumps around a bit topic-wise, but nonetheless very worthwhile to take time to read, digest, and think about the implications for health innovation in 2012+. 

    -cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    My (health) best of 2011.

    One of the questions I ask doctors is “In the past 10 years, what is an innovation that has revolutionized medical practice?” Most of them can’t answer. From a medical perspective, we’re simply stuck with tiny, incremental changes that may or may not change our health for the better. So, with that in mind, I’ve tried to choose the most important health concepts from the past 12 months. Some of them are from other people. Some of them are my own thoughts. Some of them are simply important moments in my own personal health. In no particular order:

    Trials and Errors: Why Science is Failing US

    Although the scientific process tries to makes sense of problems by isolating every variable—imagining a blood vessel, say, if HDL alone were raised—reality doesn’t work like that. Instead, we live in a world in which everything is knotted together, an impregnable tangle of causes and effects. Even when a system is dissected into its basic parts, those parts are still influenced by a whirligig of forces we can’t understand or haven’t considered or don’t think matter.

    How Doctors Die

    The nation’s “best” hospitals aren’t even in the top 400 list of safest hospitals.

    In the latest advance for health care accountability, the country’s leading hospital accreditation board, the Joint Commission, released a list on Tuesday of 405 medical centers that have been the most diligent in following protocols to treat conditions like heart attack andpneumonia. Almost without exception, most highly regarded hospitals in the United States, from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., did not make the list.

    Food Stamps Are Now Worth Double at Farmer’s Markets in Michigan

    Real Food is Cheaper than Junk Food

    The Easy Way to Stop Smoking

    The Hazards of the Couch

    The Hot Spotters

    A Food Manifesto for the Future

    Most Health Solutions Aren’t Medical, They’re Social

    Weighing the Evidence on Exercise:

    It is extremely unlikely that using exercise or a diet alone will lead to long-term weight loss.
    Exercise makes you hungry because your body wants to maintain its current state. Guard against eating more because you’re exercising. 
    Start eating real food and less calories— understand that this is how you will eat from now on.
    Start exercising. Once you hit your weight goal, continue exercising. Don’t stop.
    If you don’t change anything about your life, you’ll never weigh less than you do now.

    What Happens to Doctors Who Think Outside the Box?

    Family Planning as a Cost-Saving Preventive Health Service

    The cost of one Medicaid-covered birth in the United States (including prenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and infant care for 1 year) was $12,613 in 2008, according to estimates from the Guttmacher Institute. The national per-client cost for contraceptive care the same year was $257. In 2008, an estimated $1.9 billion was spent on publicly funded family-planning care — an investment that resulted in an estimated $7 billion in Medicaid savings for the cost of unplanned births.

    Coffee vs. Migraines

    RIP Dr. Kevorkian

    RIP Jack LaLanne

    A Measure of My Days: The Journal of a Country Doctor:

    Health is not a commodity. Risk factors are not disease. Aging is not an illness. To fix a problem is easy, to sit with another suffering is hard. Doing all we can is not the same as doing what we should. Quality is more than metrics. Patients cannot see outside their pain, we cannot see in, relationship is the only bridge between. Time is precious; we spend it on what we value. The most common condition we treat is unhappiness. And the greatest obstacle to treating a patient’s unhappiness is our own. Nothing is more patient-centered than the process of change. Doctors expect too much from data and not enough from conversation. Community is a locus of healing, not the hospital or the clinic. The foundation of medicine is friendship, conversation and hope.

    Wild Food: A tumblr I started because most people have no idea what their food looks like as it’s growing.

    Buddycare vs. Humancare

    Vaccines Save Lives. End of Story. Part 1 and Part 2.

    Everything in Your Environment is Set Up for the Way You Were Before

    Introducing my new company, Sherpaa. Launching in just a few weeks.

    Doctors of the Future:

    We’re a tribe of forward-thinking creative doctors.
    And we know that the future of healthcare depends on us.
    We’re the leaders of this revolution.
    Intrigued? You should be.

    One of the best things to happen to me.

    Photo by me from many years ago on New Years Eve at Madison Square Garden while listening to Wilco ring in the new year.