1. 11:12 6th May 2014

    Notes: 268

    Reblogged from johngushue

    Tags: techtechnologydigital life

    bobbycaputo:

    Not on App Store is a sticker designed to look like the typical “available on the App Store” badges from Apple. The project “Not Available on the App Store” by Caio Andrade, Rafael Ochoa, and Linn Livijn Wexell

    Simple, but a clever reminder that unplugging and disconnecting from the screen (be it laptop, tablet or smartphone) and exploring your immediate surroundings is good for everyone, especially young people.  I hope we don’t become a society where playgrounds are full of people (adults and kids) who are only interested and submersed in their tablets or smartphones instead of interacting with the larger, non-digital physical forms around them.     

    Make time to go out and play!

    -cch

     
  2. nickgrossman:

    "It is trust, more than money, that makes the world go round."
    — Joseph Stiglitz, In No One We Trust

    The week before last, I visited Yahoo! to give the keynote talk at their User First conference, which brought together big companies (Google, Facebook, etc), startups (big ones like USV…

    Great perspective here on how technology enabled networks have disrupted many industries and will continue to do so going forward. Long overdue in health, but innovative change is inevitable and coming.

    -cch

     
  3. 08:59 20th Dec 2013

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from indianqb18

    Tags: technologymobile

    there are perhaps 900m consumer PCs on earth, and maybe 800m corporate PCs. the consumer PCs are mostly shared and the corporate PCs locked down, and neither are really mobile - at best you can take them from table to table. those 3bn smartphones will all be personal, and all mobile.
    — 

    What does mobile scale mean? — Benedict Evans

    all of this means that the operating environment looks very different, and a lot of our assumptions need to change. a lot more is up for grabs, and the scale of success looks different. when a dozen guys in a garage with a hot service get struck by lightning, that means 50m or 100m users, not 1m, and in time it might mean 1bn.

    via.

    (via indianqb18)

    The clear compelling case for why all businesses and services must have a mobile play. Make no mistake - it’s the future.

    -cch

     
  4. image: Download

    How will technology change healthcare? The same way technology has facilitated the move of many transactions from being required in-person (shopping at the mall, playing a board game) to remote via the Internet and mobile technologies (Amazon, WordsWithFriends, Xbox Live multiplayer).  This tidal wave of disruption has not saturated healthcare as it has other industries as of yet, but it will.  It’s taking longer due to established and entrenched institutions like hospitals and providers, a more complex regulatory environment, (payment, privacy), and the fact that most healthcare transactions are not direct or full financial interactions between supplier (doctors) and consumers (patients).  Thanks to health insurance, most consumers don’t know what it actually costs to see and pay a doctor full-price for a check-up or an MRI (although this is changing with more US consumers enrolled in plans with higher deductibles, requiring individuals pay out of pocket for health costs up to a certain threshold before insurance kicks in).  However, it’s clear that technology is starting  to impact how healthcare is delivered and consumed in the US today (no comment on healthcare.gov). While B2C applications are proliferating, much of the value and spend is still on the B2B side that impact providers (EMR spend is a $21B market). There will be a tipping point as they say, and change is coming that will put more and more power in the hand of consumers.  It will soon be hard to ignore the use of more effective and efficient technology in healthcare delivery, no matter the perspective of provider, patient or payor.  However, despite many who think technology can and will solve all ills in healthcare, it’s worth keeping a healthy perspective— technology can and will plan an important role in supporting healthcare, enabling medicine to be less art and more science through accessibility of timely and rich information to make more accurate diagnoses and deliver more effective treatments.  There will be many things a computer or robot might be able to treat in the near future, such as the estimated 70% of doctor visits that are “routine” cases such as coughs, colds, headaches and can be handled via phone or video or e-mail.  This will allow doctors to spend more time with patients that are more complex and require more time to assess, diagnose and treat such as those with co-morbid and chronic conditions.  At the end of the day, there will always be a need for the human touch in medicine.   
To your health,
-cch

The attached infographic provides a visual depiction of results from a recent survey of 10,000 U.S. physicians conducted by Nuance. The survey found that 80% of U.S. physicians believe virtual assistants will drastically change healthcare by 2018.
A link to another article on Nuance’s Healthcare blog can be found here: 
http://whatsnext.nuance.com/florence-nightingale-see-us-now/

    How will technology change healthcare? The same way technology has facilitated the move of many transactions from being required in-person (shopping at the mall, playing a board game) to remote via the Internet and mobile technologies (Amazon, WordsWithFriends, Xbox Live multiplayer).  This tidal wave of disruption has not saturated healthcare as it has other industries as of yet, but it will.  It’s taking longer due to established and entrenched institutions like hospitals and providers, a more complex regulatory environment, (payment, privacy), and the fact that most healthcare transactions are not direct or full financial interactions between supplier (doctors) and consumers (patients).  Thanks to health insurance, most consumers don’t know what it actually costs to see and pay a doctor full-price for a check-up or an MRI (although this is changing with more US consumers enrolled in plans with higher deductibles, requiring individuals pay out of pocket for health costs up to a certain threshold before insurance kicks in).  However, it’s clear that technology is starting  to impact how healthcare is delivered and consumed in the US today (no comment on healthcare.gov). While B2C applications are proliferating, much of the value and spend is still on the B2B side that impact providers (EMR spend is a $21B market). There will be a tipping point as they say, and change is coming that will put more and more power in the hand of consumers.  It will soon be hard to ignore the use of more effective and efficient technology in healthcare delivery, no matter the perspective of provider, patient or payor.  However, despite many who think technology can and will solve all ills in healthcare, it’s worth keeping a healthy perspective— technology can and will plan an important role in supporting healthcare, enabling medicine to be less art and more science through accessibility of timely and rich information to make more accurate diagnoses and deliver more effective treatments.  There will be many things a computer or robot might be able to treat in the near future, such as the estimated 70% of doctor visits that are “routine” cases such as coughs, colds, headaches and can be handled via phone or video or e-mail.  This will allow doctors to spend more time with patients that are more complex and require more time to assess, diagnose and treat such as those with co-morbid and chronic conditions.  At the end of the day, there will always be a need for the human touch in medicine.   

    To your health,

    -cch

    The attached infographic provides a visual depiction of results from a recent survey of 10,000 U.S. physicians conducted by Nuance. The survey found that 80% of U.S. physicians believe virtual assistants will drastically change healthcare by 2018.

    A link to another article on Nuance’s Healthcare blog can be found here: 

    http://whatsnext.nuance.com/florence-nightingale-see-us-now/

     
  5. This is a revolutionary shift. Once upon a time, medicine was a discipline based on the nuanced diagnosis and treatment of sick patients. Now, Big Data, networked computers and a culture obsessed with knowing its numbers have moved medicine from the bedside to the desktop (or laptop). The art of medicine is becoming the science of an insurance actuary.
    — Statins by Numbers - NYTimes.com (via fred-wilson)

    Truth: “The art of medicine is becoming the science of an insurance actuary”. However, it’s necessary to never forget the human element in the ultimate delivery of care - it cannot ever be just all (cold) hard numbers.

    -cch

     
  6. jayparkinsonmd:

    My friends at Collaborative Fund made a video about Sherpaa and the reasons why we built this wonderful company. I really just want to delight people and inspire you to be healthy— something that’s unheard of in today’s version of healthcare.

    Great company, mission… and video.

    Here’s to a bright future for Jay & Co and also other healthcare entrepreneurs using technology to provide more efficient, effective, and quality care to the masses.

    To your health,

    -cch

     
  7. image: Download

    marksbirch:

Having grown up in Brooklyn, I would never have imagined that tech would be a booming industry.  Incredible and inspiring to see…
nycdigital:

The Brooklyn Tech Triangle is working together to grow the tech and creative community.  A strategic plan was released by the Brooklyn Tech Triangle coalition to help make NYC the leading tech hub in the nation.  The strategy includes calls for enhancing workforce development, increasing availability of affordable real estate, improving transportation and more.  The plan focuses on areas in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Read the full plan at http://brooklyntechtriangle.com


Here’s to good things happening in #Brooklyn! -cch

    marksbirch:

    Having grown up in Brooklyn, I would never have imagined that tech would be a booming industry.  Incredible and inspiring to see…

    nycdigital:

    The Brooklyn Tech Triangle is working together to grow the tech and creative community.  A strategic plan was released by the Brooklyn Tech Triangle coalition to help make NYC the leading tech hub in the nation.  The strategy includes calls for enhancing workforce development, increasing availability of affordable real estate, improving transportation and more.  The plan focuses on areas in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Read the full plan at http://brooklyntechtriangle.com

    Here’s to good things happening in #Brooklyn!

    -cch

     
  8. collaborativefund:

    by
    Founder/CEO at Collaborative Fund

    In San Francisco, you can find the “Airbnb-of-everything.” Just as Airbnb capitalized on the fact that many of us have a spare bed, bedroom, or even apartment from which we’d gladly make some money, many other industries have…

    Times… they (and industries and cultures) certainly are a-changing thanks to confluence of Internet + technology + social + mobile.

    Personally, I’m waiting and hoping that they most radically impact healthcare (including food/nutrition), education, and energy above all.

    -cch

    (Source: collaborativefund)

     
  9. toddwickersty:

    But I’m a user first and that’s the main reason why I care what happens to it. I’m skeptical if Yahoo! does take it over. It’s super easy to be skeptical for obvious reasons, but I think it’s a good time for Tumblr to sell. I know if it does happen, I’ll continue to use it…

    Good perspective here on Tumblr community and being mindful of product and customer/community culture. I do not disagree.

    HOWEVER let’s be real and clear about the essential truth of the matter: no one person, not any single person (regardless of whether a seasoned VC or fellow tried and true entrepreneur) can truly understand the perspective or mindset of the founder(s) of this (or any) particular start-up company. There are ups and downs in any startup life, but there is also the personal history and dynamic that NO ONE can relate to except THE PERSON (PEOPLE) in THOSE shoes at THAT time.

    I love social media (and Tumblr obviously) in that it amplifies good and bad in this world and in particular it gives a voice and platform to anyone who wants to share an opinion.

    But let’s be mindful of that - they are individual people’s opinions. The founders of Tumblr or any startup at the end of the day don’t owe anything to their community, their customers, their colleagues or their investors. They owe it to themselves and what they see in the mirror each morning and to their families who have been through the journey with them, supporting them through highs and lows. IF the founders decide (for themselves without outside pressure) that this is the right time to sell and this is the right acquirer and this is the right price…. then let’s cheer and applaud them for a successful journey to date and outcome and wish them well for the future; let’s not second judge or criticize them from afar for timing, for whichever company they sold to, or the price.

    -cch

     
  10. Stop Optimizing For Social and Learn SEO

    scottbritton:

    When I first started blogging, I didn’t use keywords and paid no attention to SEO. I WANTED FOLLOWERS BABY! 

    Eventually I learned basic SEO and started employing it on everything I created.

    Now organic search from long tail keywords make up more than half of my traffic. Twitter makes up a little more than 5%.

    Learn SEO. Then get good at it.

    Nice succinct post and fair argument in terms of balance between social and SEO.

    -cch

     
  11. rudolphmd:

    From the March 26th, 2013 The New Republic article by Leon Wiesletier (link to full article below):

    “’With the help of big data,’ Mayer-Schönberger and Cukier continue, ‘we will no longer regard our world as a string of happenings that we explain as natural and social phenomena, but as a universe comprised essentially of information.’ … The religion of information is another distorting totalism, another counterfeit deliverance. In some ways the technology is transforming us into brilliant fools… in which we presume to believe that eventually we will know everything and longing will come to seem obsolete and merely ignorant…”

    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/112734/what-big-data-will-never-explain

    Great read in terms of our society, generating more and more data, and the collection, synthesis and application of it all.

    -cch

     
  12. image: Download

    A little social media & tech humor. Although I wonder if this transaction should be updated to be shown virtually or via Entelo, BranchOut or TalentBin instead of IRL.  Might be reality in the not-too-distant future!-cch

    A little social media & tech humor. Although I wonder if this transaction should be updated to be shown virtually or via Entelo, BranchOut or TalentBin instead of IRL. Might be reality in the not-too-distant future!

    -cch

     
  13. image: Download

    jayparkinsonmd:

Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 
I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 
It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 
It’s a classic disruptive innovation. 
I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.
My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature  enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness. -cch

    jayparkinsonmd:

    Moves is disrupting Fitbit, the Fuelband, and all those other nonsensical gadgets. 

    I’ve been using Moves for about 2 weeks now and I really, really love it. It’s an app that essentially functions as a pedometer and runs in the background tracing where you’ve been throughout the day and measuring your steps. 

    It is not some goofy thing I have to wear on my wrist or on your bra. It’s not something I have to remember to charge. Fire it up once, and it’s on for as long as you have an iPhone. It may not be as “good” as a Fitbit or Fuelband, but it works just fine, it’s available to everyone with an iPhone for free, and it runs in the background of your life. And, most importantly, I haven’t noticed an impact on my iPhone’s battery. 

    It’s a classic disruptive innovation

    I bought a Fuelband a few months ago, synced it with my iPhone, and connected it to Facebook. Facebook said “You have 37 friends with a Fuelband. Click here to see how many people have live data in the past week.” I clicked and saw 2 people. I immediately returned it to the Nike Store. I knew that goofy thing would be in some drawer in a month after the novelty wore off. And I don’t like to throw away money for gimmicks.

    My iPhone is not a novelty. And Moves now runs in the background of my life letting me know how active or inactive I’ve been that day. Interesting, motivating, and exciting stuff. Congrats to the Moves team. Y’all are killin’ it.

    Disruptive innovation in #mhealth quantified self tracking? Definitely will check it out since Jay is one sharp guy in technology and health, but I’m not 100% certain the sector is mature enough at this point to declare entrenched dominant winners who are at risk of disruptive innovation (see HBS Prof Clay Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation at his site: www.claytonchristensen.com). In another 3-5 years? Perhaps. But onward and upward for available and affordable technology to improve health and fitness.

    -cch

     
  14. image: Download

    Good infographic here. 

All companies, big and small, must be mindful of the customer experience with their product/service offering. 

Needless to say, when companies lose site of this, it means tough times for the business sooner or later. 

To a great 2013,

-cch



fredericwilliquet:

(via Rethinking the Customer Journey in a Social World - Forbes)
    Good infographic here. All companies, big and small, must be mindful of the customer experience with their product/service offering. Needless to say, when companies lose site of this, it means tough times for the business sooner or later. To a great 2013, -cch

    fredericwilliquet:

    (via Rethinking the Customer Journey in a Social World - Forbes)

     
  15. When robots and automation do our most basic work, making it relatively easy for us to be fed, clothed, and sheltered, then we are free to ask, “What are humans for?”
    — 

    Great Wired article on the future of robots, artificial intelligence, automation and their impact on human workforces. It’s really fun (and necessary) to think about this stuff and how it will change not just our economy but our sense of purpose as a species. We live in some interesting times. (via chriskurdziel)

    Great read.

    -cch